Benton MacKaye: conservationist, planner, and creator of the Appalachian Trail

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Johns Hopkins University Press, Nov 12, 2002 - Architecture - 452 pages

Planner and originator of the Appalachian Trail and a cofounder of the Wilderness Society, Benton MacKaye (1879-1975) was a pioneer in linking the concepts of preservation and recreation. Spanning three-quarters of a century, his long and productive career had a major impact on emerging movements in conservation, environmentalism, and regional planning. MacKaye's seminal ideas on outdoor recreation, wilderness protection, land-use planning, community development, and transportation have inspired generations of activists, professionals, and adventurers seeking to strike a harmonious balance between human need and the natural environment.

This pathbreaking biography provides the first complete portrait of this significant and unique figure in American environmental, intellectual, and cultural history. Drawing on extensive research, Larry Anderson traces MacKaye's extensive career, examines his many published works, and describes the importance of MacKaye's relationships with such influential figures as Lewis Mumford, Aldo Leopold, and Walter Lippmann. This book will appeal to students, scholars, and professionals in preservation, conservation, recreation, planning, and American studies, as well as general readers interested in these subjects.

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Contents

INTRODUCTION Expedition 9
1
The MacKaye Inheritance 18791896
10
From Harvard Yard to the Primaevial Forest 18961903
29
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

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Larry Anderson is a freelance writer and independent scholar.