Beowulf: An Old English Poem

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K. Paul, Trench, 1883 - 179 pages
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Page 164 - Nor tempt the stormy firth to-day. "The blackening wave is edged with white; To inch and rock the sea-mews fly ; The fishers have heard the Water-Sprite, Whose screams forebode that wreck is nigh.
Page 179 - We find our tenets just the same at last. Both fairly owning Riches, in effect, No grace of Heaven or token of th' elect; Given to the fool, the mad, the vain, the evil, To Ward, to Waters, Chartres, and the devil.
Page 155 - ... are all of one kind, but of different lengths, varying from four to ten inches. They are simply lengths of square rod iron with perforated ends, through which pass the rings connecting them with the diamond-shaped links ; they all show the impression of cloth over a considerable part of the surface...
Page 167 - Faith, husband, and Ralph says true; for they say the King of Portugal cannot sit at his meat, but the giants and the ettins will come and snatch it from him.
Page 164 - Nick," who is none other than Nikr,3 the dangerous water-demon of Scandinavian legend. This dreaded monster, as the Norwegian peasant will gravely assure you, demands every year a human victim, and carries off children who stray too near his abode beneath the waters. In Iceland also, Nykr, the water-horse, is still believed to inhabit some of the lonely tarns scattered over the savage region of desolation which occupies the central portion of the island.
Page 149 - In the middle of the vessel a large oaken block, solidly fastened to the bottom, has a square hole for the mast. . . . In this part of the vessel was built the funereal chamber, formed by strong planks and beams placed obliquely against each other, and covering a room of nearly fifteen feet square. ... A few human bones, some shreds of a sort of brocade, several fragments of bridles, saddles, and the like in bronze, silver, and lead, and a couple of metal buttons, one of them with a remarkable representation...
Page 154 - The latter consists of a skeleton formed of iron bands (fig. 431) radiating from the crown of the head, and riveted to a circle of the same metal which encompassed the brow: from the impression on the metal it is evident that the outside was covered with plates of horn disposed diagonally so as to produce a herring-bone pattern ; the ends of these plates were secured beneath with strips of horn corresponding Fig.
Page 154 - ... the same metal which encompassed the brow: from the impression on the metal it is evident that the outside was covered with plates of horn disposed diagonally so as to produce a herringbone pattern. the ends of these plates were secured beneath with strips of horn corresponding with the iron framework. and attached to it by ornamental rivets of silver at intervals of about an inch and a half from each other: on the bottom of the front rib. which projects so as to form a nasal. is a small silver...
Page 114 - Poor soul, the centre of my sinful earth, Fool'd by these rebel powers that thee array, Why dost thou pine within, and suffer dearth, Painting thy outward walls so costly gay? Why so large cost, having so short a lease, Dost thou upon thy fading mansion spend? Shall worms, inheritors of this excess, Eat up thy charge? Is this thy body's end? Then, soul, live thou upon thy servant's loss...
Page 155 - Mr Bateman adds, that there was found with the helmet a mass of chain-work, formed of ' a large quantity of links, of two descriptions, attached to each other by small rings, half an inch in diameter ; one kind is flat and lozenge-shaped, about...

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