Berlin: 1932-1933: Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works, Volume 12

Front Cover
Fortress Press, 2009 - Religion - 680 pages
5 Reviews
"Then came the crisis of 1933." This is Bonhoeffer's own phrase in a letter that documents a turning point in his own life as well as that of the nation. Of Bonhoeffer's own life at this time, his biographer writes, "The period of learning and roaming" from 1928 until 1931 "had come to an end" as the young lecturer, age 26, began to teach "on a faculty whose theology he did not share" and to preach "in a church whose self-confidence he regarded as unfounded." Bonhoeffer was becoming part of a society "that was moving toward political, social, and economic chaos."
 

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Review: Ethics (Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works #6)

User Review  - Lauren Sheil - Goodreads

The first half was excellent as it spoke mainly of the relationship between the individual and God. The second half spoke mainly of the interaction between the church, state, government and God ... Read full review

Review: Life Together and Prayerbook of the Bible (Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works)

User Review  - Charlton - Goodreads

Life Together was a very challenging book for me. Bonhoeffer discusses our objective connection to other Christians, and I'm still trying to wrap my head around it. "What persons are in themselves as ... Read full review

Contents

III
1
IV
51
V
53
VI
56
VII
58
VIII
60
IX
61
X
62
LXXXVIII
147
XC
148
XCI
149
XCII
150
XCIV
151
XCV
152
XCVI
153
XCVII
154

XII
63
XIII
65
XIV
66
XV
67
XVI
68
XVIII
69
XIX
70
XXI
71
XXII
72
XXIV
73
XXVI
74
XXVIII
75
XXIX
76
XXXI
77
XXXII
79
XXXIII
80
XXXIV
81
XXXV
82
XXXVI
85
XXXVII
86
XXXVIII
87
XXXIX
88
XL
89
XLI
90
XLII
91
XLIII
92
XLIV
94
XLV
95
XLVI
96
XLVIII
97
XLIX
98
L
99
LI
100
LII
103
LIII
104
LIV
105
LV
106
LVII
107
LVIII
109
LIX
111
LX
112
LXI
113
LXII
114
LXIV
115
LXV
117
LXVI
118
LXVIII
120
LXIX
121
LXX
122
LXXI
123
LXXII
131
LXXIII
132
LXXV
134
LXXVII
135
LXXVIII
137
LXXX
139
LXXXI
140
LXXXII
141
LXXXIV
143
LXXXVI
145
LXXXVII
146
XCVIII
155
XCIX
156
C
157
CI
159
CII
160
CIV
161
CV
162
CVII
163
CIX
164
CXI
166
CXII
169
CXIII
171
CXIV
172
CXV
174
CXVI
175
CXVII
177
CXVIII
179
CXIX
181
CXX
184
CXXII
185
CXXIII
186
CXXIV
187
CXXVI
189
CXXVII
191
CXXVIII
214
CXXIX
233
CXXX
236
CXXXI
243
CXXXII
258
CXXXIII
262
CXXXIV
266
CXXXV
268
CXXXVI
282
CXXXVII
285
CXXXVIII
299
CXXXIX
361
CXL
371
CXLI
374
CXLII
425
CXLIII
432
CXLIV
437
CXLV
439
CXLVI
446
CXLVII
448
CXLVIII
454
CXLIX
461
CL
468
CLI
472
CLII
477
CLIII
483
CLIV
509
CLV
515
CLVI
519
CLVII
525
CLVIII
526
CLIX
529
CLX
561
CLXI
565
CLXII
617
CLXIII
679
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About the author (2009)

Born in 1906 in Breslau, Germany, now part of Poland, Dietrich Bonhoeffer became a radical theologian. He was raised in a home where the intellect was honored. His father was a physician and professor of psychiatry at the University of Berlin. Such scholars as the church historian Adolph von Harnack, the theologian and sociohistorian Ernst Troeltsch, and Max Weber, a founder of modern sociology, were frequent guests of the Bonhoeffers. A precocious student who evidenced a degree of independence of thought that was at odds with the reverence in which his fellow students held their professors, Bonhoeffer decided early on the church and theology as his life's work. He was a product of liberal studies that were greatly influenced by Karl Barth. Bonhoeffer's doctoral dissertation, Sanctorum Communio: A Dogmatic Investigation of the Sociology of the Church, was published in 1930, at the time he was teaching theology at the University of Berlin. A year's study in the United States followed and leadership of the World Alliance of Churches, where his flair for languages and his genial disposition won him many friends. His American and British friends tried unsuccessfully to dissuade him from returning to Germany after the rise of Hitler in 1932. But Bonhoeffer returned, and joining the so-called Confessing Church of those who resisted Germanizing the church, he conducted an illegal seminary in Finkenwalde. Out of this experience came his Life Together; out of his struggles to encourage Christians to resist the Nazis came The Cost of Discipleship, his study of the Sermon on the Mount. Although Bonhoeffer escaped military duty by joining the intelligence service, he was eventually arrested and imprisoned by the Gestapo and was linked to the attempt on Hitler's life. His Letters and Papers from Prison (translated in 1953), was his testimony of faith; the writing gave the American death of God movement the term religionless Christianity. Bonhoeffer was killed in 1945 while he was in prison in Flossenburg.

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