Berlioz: Roméo Et Juliette

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 26, 1994 - Music - 119 pages
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Berlioz's 'dramatic symphony' Romo et Juliette is regarded by many as his finest work; it is certainly among the most original. It is played less often than his earlier symphonies, because it requires solo voices and chorus; yet at its heart is some of the most inspired orchestral music of the nineteenth century. This book summarises the complex genesis of the work before examining the music closely and always with a view to understanding its dramatic implications. The early and later critical reception is quoted and discussed and Julian Rushton concludes by suggesting a way of hearing the work which recognises the value of its mixed genre. The complete libretto is provided in both English and French.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The genesis of Romeo et Juliette
11
Berlioz Shakespeare and Garrick
15
Introduction and Prologue Romeo seul
21
Appendix 2
23
Scene damour La reine Mab
35
Convoi funebre
47
A view from 1839 by Stephen Heller
60
1839 and beyond
70
Romeo et Juliette as covert opera
80
Appendix 1
85
a Berliozs Preface 87
86
d Berlioz on the genre instrumental expressif
90
Texts
91
Select bibliography
115
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