Best Practices in Gifted Education: An Evidence-Based Guide

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Sourcebooks, Inc., 2006 - Education - 286 pages
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Best Practices in Gifted Education provides concise, up-to-date, research-based advice to educators, administrators, and parents of gifted and talented youth. The 29 practices included in this volume are the result of an extensive examination of educational research on what works with talented youth. This book is a service publication of the National Association for Gifted Children (Washington, DC). This designation indicates that this book has been jointly developed with NAGC and that this book passes the highest standards of scholarship, research, and practice. Educational Resource
 

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Contents

FOREWORD
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
INTRODUCTION
PART I
PARENT INVOLVEMENT
SOCIALEMOTIONAL ADJUSTMENT AND PEER RELATIONS
STUDENTS WHO ARE TWICEEXCEPTIONAL
GENDER DIFFERENCES
USING PRIMARY SOURCES IN HISTORY
LANGUAGE ARTS INSTRUCTION
READING INSTRUCTION
SCIENCE IN THE CLASSROOM
PART III
MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM
ARTS IN THE CURRICULUM
LEARNING MULTIPLE LANGUAGES

DEVELOPING SPECIFIC TALENTS
EARLY LITERACY EXPERIENCES FOR PRECOCIOUS AND EMERGING READERS
MENTORS AND MENTORSHIPS
UNIVERSITYBASED PROGRAMS
PART II
ENCOURAGING CREATIVITY
MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES
HIGHER LEVEL THINKING
INQUIRYBASED LEARNING AND TEACHING
COMPACTING THE CURRICULUM
FLEXIBLE GROUPING
INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY
CAREER EDUCATION
SCHOOL PROGRAMS
ACCELERATION
MULTIPLE CRITERIA FOR IDENTIFICATION
DEVELOPING TALENTS IN CULTURALLY DIVERSE LEARNERS
PROMISING LEARNERS FROM LOWINCOME BACKGROUNDS
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR TEACHERS
CONCLUSION
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
INDEX
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Ann Robinson is professor of education and founding director of the Center for Gifted Education at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. She is a former editor of Gifted Child Quarterly, serves on the board of directors for the National Association for Gifted Children as the finance secretary, and has received the Early Leader and the Early Scholar Awards from the association. In 2004, she and coauthor Sidney Moon received the Gifted Child Quarterly Paper of the Year Award for "The National Study of State and Local Advocacy in Gifted Education." With Shore, Cornell, and Ward, Robinson coauthored Recommended Practices in Gifted Education: A Critical Analysis, identified as one of the 50 most influential works in gifted education by a division of the National Association for Gifted Children. She was a charter board member of the Special Interest Group on Giftedness and Talent of the American Educational Research Association. In 2000, Robinson was recognized as the Purdue University Alumna of Distinction for the College of Education. Her own institution honored her with the University Award for Public Service in 2001. Robinson is the president of the Arkansans for Gifted and Talented Education, the immediate past president of the Arkansas Association of Gifted Education Administrators, and is active in advocacy at the state and national levels. In 2006 she received the NAGC Distinguished Service Award.

Bruce M. Shore is professor of educational psychology in the Faculty of Education at McGill University in Montreal, where he also has served as chair of the department and dean of students. His research has addressed the ways in which gifted students think and learn differently from other students, how the development of giftedness parallels that of expertise, and understanding learning processes in inquiry-driven environments. He and his graduate students currently are focused on such topics as interprofessional education and practice, inquiry in teacher education and undergraduate science education, how research ideas arise, and the identification and evaluation of the outcomes of inquiry-based teaching and learning. He has a bachelor's degree in mathematics and chemistry (with psychology), a teaching diploma in secondary mathematics and science, a master's degree in education from McGill University, and a Ph.D. in educational psychology from The University of Calgary.

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