Best Research Practices

Front Cover
Lulu.com, 2009 - Science - 229 pages
1 Review
Clearly explains how to plan and carry out reliable experiments, how to conceive and circumstantially support research hypotheses, how to test research hypotheses, how to discover cause and effect, and more. For students and practitioners in all fields of the physical, life, earth, social, and engineering sciences. Contains more than 150 illustrative research examples from all fields. Based on Professor Romesburg's examination of 5,000 top scientific articles, studying the methods used to produce reliable knowledge. See the book's first page explaining the blind peer review of the book that was commissioned and paid for by the author's academic department; see the book's back cover for peer reviewer comments. To read most of it, go to Google Book Search (http://books.google.com/) and enter this: Romesburg Best Research Practices - then click on the book.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

45 The benefits of having control groups in HD tests
110
46 How to test hypotheses economically
113
47 How progress in science depends on both the retroductive method and the HD method
125
48 Why researchers have to be good at using both the retroductive method and the HD method
131
49 How to present HD tests to an audience
132
410 What the word theory means
135
How to discover cause and effect
137
51 The direct method of discovering cause and effect
138

27 The premeasurement stage is potentially thick with sources of systematic error
24
28 The advantages of standard constructs
27
29 Systematic errors dont always cancel out in comparative experiments
29
210 How to minimize systematic error
32
211 How to determine the proper sample size for experiments
33
212 How to reward your collaborating statistician
38
213 Experiments that do not involve sample units
41
214 Three questions that researchers describing their experiments must answer
42
216 About qualitative facts
43
217 The place of experimental facts in Pplane diagrams
44
How to conceive and circumstantially support research hypotheses
47
31 What research hypotheses are
49
32 The retroductive method as practiced in everyday affairs
51
33 How to use the retroductive method to conceive research hypotheses
52
34 How to use the question method and the subject method to conceive research hypotheses
55
35 How to recursively conceive and evaluate research hypotheses
57
36 Assembling circumstantial evidence that amounts to a smoking gun
63
37 Mechanistic research hypotheses
67
38 The method of multiple working hypotheses
71
39 Picturing the role of research hypotheses in science
73
310 A list of research examples
75
How to test research hypotheses
87
41 Everyday examples of the HD method
88
42 The five steps of testing any research hypothesis
93
43 A list of research examples illustrating the HD method
97
44 The benefits of performing multiple HD tests of a hypothesis
106
52 The indirect method of discovering cause and effect
142
53 The importance of minimizing systematic and random errors in causeeffect research
152
54 How the indirect method has a good deal going for it
153
55 Pseudoscientific claims of cause and effect
154
56 Reciprocal causeeffect relations
156
How to decide if chance can easily produce that interesting fact
157
62 The baserate method of testing the hypothesis of chance
166
63 Where the hypothesis of chance cannot be tested
168
How to discover knowledge by building and using reasoning models
175
71 Using reasoning models to predict facts
176
72 Using reasoning models to explain a fact
181
73 Using reasoning models to do thought experiments
186
How to discover knowledge by building and using computer simulation models
193
82 Using computer simulation models to predict facts
195
83 Using computer simulation models to explain processes of nature
196
84 Using computer simulation models to do thought experiments
197
85 How to make computer simulation models be as reliable as they can be
199
How to minimize the ethical biases in research
209
Why the funding of basic research must be increased
213
102 How basic research brings nonmaterial benefits
215
Tips on how to become a better researcher
217
Review of statistical terms
219
References
221
Index
227
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Romesburg has interests in business and ecoology. He holds a PhD in management science, and has worked in industry. Currently, he is a professor of forestry, and has received his college's award for excellence in teaching, and The Wildlife Society's publication award for excellence in research.

Bibliographic information