Betrayal in Blood: The Murder of Tabatha Bryant

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Pinnacle Books, 2006 - True Crime - 415 pages
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Her Cheating Heart

"Mommy...won't be with us anymore." That's what attorney Kevin C. Bryant, 45, told his two young sons in the spring of 2003. At the time, blonde, pretty, 26-year-old Tabatha Bryant was alive and well in an upscale suburb of Rochester, New York. But that was about to change--because Bryant knew his wife was cheating--and he intended to end the affair by ending her life. On June 14, 2003, he called 911 to report Tabatha slain by an unknown intruder who'd shot her in the eye with a .22 and repeatedly stabbed her in the neck and upper body.

His Evil Plan

A drug bust led to Cassidy Green's confession that she'd driven the getaway car. She fingered boyfriend Cyril Winebrenner as the killer. He and Kevin Bryant were buddies who'd regularly gone on cocaine-fueled sex binges with hookers. Astoundingly, Winebrenner was also Tabatha's half-brother--but Bryant's $5,000 had convinced him that money is thicker than blood. In a trial that shook "Country Club Row," prosecutors would present evidence and testimonies that revealed ever more sordid details, leading to final justice for the lawyer who tried to get away with murder...

 

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I love true crime books... however this one was a little hard to follow and in the 36th chapter, the author begins changing a female name leading to only more confusion. (The name Cassy is changed to Cassidy several times)
The story was way over drawn out with details that in no way correlated with the plot. I did not care to know about the history of the news reporter that was covering the story. I agree with a previous statement, it could have been a 150 page book.
If I knew what I know now, I would NOT have bought this book.
 

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About the author (2006)

David Dyergrew up in a coastal town in NSW, Australia, and graduated as dux of his high school in 1984. After commencing a degree in medicine and surgery at the University of Sydney, he soon decided it was not for him.

David went on to train as a ship's officer at the Australian Maritime College, travelling Australia and the world in a wide range of merchant ships. He graduated from the college with distinction and was awarded a number of prizes, including the Company of Master Mariners Award for highest overall achievement in the course. He then returned to the University of Sydney to complete a combined degree in Arts and Law. David was awarded the Frank Albert Prize for first place in Music I, High Distinctions in all English courses and First Class Honours in Law. From the mid-1990s until early 2000s David worked as a litigation lawyer in Sydney, and then in London at a legal practice whose parent firm represented the Titanic's owners back in 1912. In 2002 David returned to Australia and obtained a Diploma in Education from the University of New England, and commenced teaching English at Kambala, a school for girls in Sydney's eastern suburbs.

David has had a life-long obsession with the Titanic and has become an expert on the subject. In 2009 he was awarded a Commonwealth Government scholarship to write The Midni

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