Between Law and Diplomacy: The Social Contexts of Disputing at the World Trade Organization

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Stanford University Press, Dec 21, 2010 - Law - 264 pages
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Between Law and Diplomacy crafts an insider's look at international trade disputes at one of the most important institutions in the global economy—the World Trade Organization. The WTO regulates the global rules for trade, and—unique among international organizations—it provides a legalized process for litigation between countries over trade grievances. Drawing on interviews with trade lawyers, ambassadors, trade delegations, and trade jurists, this book details how trade has become increasingly legalized and the implications of that for power relations between rich and poor countries. Joseph Conti looks closely at who uses the system to initiate and pursue disputes, who settles and on what terms, and the relative disconnect between pursuing a dispute and what a country gains through efforts to gain compliance with WTO dictates. Through this inside look at the process of disputing, Conti provides fresh perspective on how and why the law authorizes the use of specific resources and tactics in the ever unfolding struggle for control in the global economy.
 

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Contents

1 Sociolegal Studies and Disputing at the World Trade Organization
1
From GATT to WTO
24
3 The WTO Dispute Settlement Process
59
Legal Mobilization at the World Trade Organization
68
The Institutional Influences on Dispute Transitions
97
6 Compliance Measures
123
7 Power Law and the Future of the Global Trading System
161
Appendix
193
Notes
209
Works Cited
219
Index
239
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About the author (2010)

Joseph A. Conti is Assistant Professor of Law and Sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

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