Between self-determination and dependency: Jamaica's foreign relations, 1972-1989

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University of the West Indies Press, 2000 - Political Science - 221 pages
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Between Self-Determination and Dependency analyses the nature and trajectory of Jamaica's foreign relations from 1972 to 1989. The central argument is that the relative autonomy of the Jamaican state declined due to the evolution of a new international regime which in effect disallowed the political, social and economic experimentation originally envisioned. Neither the attempt at radical nationalism by the People's National Party, nor the 'accommodationist' stance of the Jamaica Labour Party served to reduce Jamaica's structural dependency.

The analysis factors in the political and economic interests and policies of both domestic and foreign social forces as they negotiated the foreign policies of the Jamaican state. Thus, the text employs a more holistic perspective. It departs from earlier studies that tended to focus on the diplomatic history of the country's foreign relations without illuminating the various co-determinants that defined the context of state action.

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The definitive study of Jamaican foreign policy. Read full review

Contents

19721980
14
Jamaica and Cuba
30
Jamaica the US and International Capital in the 1970s
52
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About the author (2000)

HOLGER HENKE is a Research Fellow at the Caribbean Research Center at Medgar Evers College (CUNY).

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