Beyond Armageddon: twenty-one sermons to the dead

Front Cover
D.I. Fine, 1985 - Fiction - 387 pages
0 Reviews
Science fiction short stories explore the nature of life in the aftermath of a nuclear war

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

FOREWARNING an Introduction Walter M Miller Jr
3
SALVADOR Lucius Shepard 1
17
THE STORE OF THE WORLDS Robert Sheckley
37
LOT Ward Moore
70
DAY AT THE BEACH Carol Emshwiller
97
JODY AFTER THE WAR Edward Bryant
116
TOMORROWS CHILDREN Poul Anderson
146
HEIRS APPARENT Robert Abemathy
174
GAME PRESERVE Rog Phillips
224
BY THE WATERS OF BABYLON Stephen V Benet
239
THERE WILL COME SOFT RAINS Ray Bradbury
253
LUCIFER Roger Zelazny
272
THE FEAST OF SAINT JANIS Michael Swanwick
295
FORGET THEE OH EARTH Arthur C Clarke
326
MY LIFE IN THE JUNGLE Jim Aikin
374
Copyright

A MASTER OF BABYLON Edgar Pangbom
197

Other editions - View all

About the author (1985)

Miller's participation in the bombing of Casino, Italy, during World War II apparently had a lasting impact on the writer, for his only novel, A Canticle for Leibowitz (1960), is rife with images of massive destruction caused by war. Miller began writing short stories in 1950 while recovering from an automobile accident, and most of his writing was done between 1950 and 1960. Often regarded as one of the best science fiction novels ever written, A Canticle for Leibowitz is a complex, beautifully written book that traces human history from a twentieth-century nuclear war forward to another war in a.d. 3781. It stands as one of the best examples of the fear that millions of people have of the power of nuclear weapons and the aftermath of nuclear holocaust. Richly symbolic and multilayered, the novel lends itself to critical commentary more than do most popular works of literature. Critic John B. Ower remarks that, perhaps because of his conversion to Catholicism, "Miller's religious belief is complex and comprehensive enough to contain within itself the dark misgivings, the ironies, and the ambiguities of our deeply disturbed century.

Martin H. Greenberg was born in 1942. He received a doctorate in Political Science in 1969 and was a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin until 1995. Over the course of his long and prolific career, Greenberg has published around 1000 anthologies and has worked with numerous best-selling authors including Isaac Asimov, Tom Clancy, Stephen King, Anne McCaffrey, Sue Grafton, Scott Turow and Dean Koontz. He has won numerous awards including the Horror Guild Award in 1994, the Deathrealm Award in 1996, the Bram Stoker Award in 1998, and the Prometheus Special Award in 2005. He also received The Ellery Queen Award for lifetime achievement in mystery editing and the Milford Award for lifetime achievement in science fiction editing.

Bibliographic information