Beyond Second Opinions: Making Choices about Fertility Treatment

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University of California Press, 1998 - Health & Fitness - 393 pages
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Beyond Second Opinions is both an expos of the risks, errors, and distortions surrounding fertility medicine and an authoritative guide for people seeking treatment. Accessible, comprehensive, and extremely well-informed, this book takes the reader beyond hype to the hard data on diagnoses and treatments. Judith Steinberg Turiel, a consumer health activist and herself a veteran of fertility treatments, uses the most up-to-date medical literature to shed new light on difficult decisions patients face today and on reproductive questions society must begin to address now. Those who are seeking a more balanced perspective to help them make better, more informed decisions will find a wealth of information about current reproductive interventions--from simple fertility pills to dazzling experimental options--as well as a discussion of the non-medical forces (economic and political) that shape an individual's treatment choices and reproductive outcomes.
Despite quantities of information showered upon patients, they remain woefully misinformed; some fertility treatments may actually reduce chances for a successful pregnancy and threaten a patient's health. Turiel looks beyond surface claims to the real information, often uncovering counterintuitive findings and sometimes scandalous revelations. She exposes a realm of unregulated expansion, unscientific experimentation, and recent scandal over stolen embryos. Weaving together first-hand accounts, compelling stories, a range of scientific information, and lively anecdotes, Turiel addresses the persistent gulfs that separate medical professionals and health care consumers. In the process she arms laypeople with what they might not learn about infertility practices from doctors, patient education brochures, and the newspaper. Beyond Second Opinions is both an expos of the risks, errors, and distortions surrounding fertility medicine and an authoritative guide for people seeking treatment. Accessible, comprehensive, and extremely well-informed, this book takes the reader beyond hype to the hard data on diagnoses and treatments. Judith Steinberg Turiel, a consumer health activist and herself a veteran of fertility treatments, uses the most up-to-date medical literature to shed new light on difficult decisions patients face today and on reproductive questions society must begin to address now. Those who are seeking a more balanced perspective to help them make better, more informed decisions will find a wealth of information about current reproductive interventions--from simple fertility pills to dazzling experimental options--as well as a discussion of the non-medical forces (economic and political) that shape an individual's treatment choices and reproductive outcomes.
Despite quantities of information showered upon patients, they remain woefully misinformed; some fertility treatments may actually reduce chances for a successful pregnancy and threaten a patient's health. Turiel looks beyond surface claims to the real information, often uncovering counterintuitive findings and sometimes scandalous revelations. She exposes a realm of unregulated expansion, unscientific experimentation, and recent scandal over stolen embryos. Weaving together first-hand accounts, compelling stories, a range of scientific information, and lively anecdotes, Turiel addresses the persistent gulfs that separate medical professionals and health care consumers. In the process she arms laypeople with what they might not learn about infertility practices from doctors, patient education brochures, and the newspaper.
 

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Beyond second opinions: making choices about fertility treatment

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Critical evaluations of infertility treatment present a minefield for collection development; these works often assume that the reader has a theoretical orientation and not a real-life information ... Read full review

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Page 314 - A description of any benefits to the subject or to others which may reasonably be expected from the research; 4. A disclosure of appropriate alternative procedures or courses of treatment, if any, that might be advantageous to the subject; 5. A statement describing the extent, if any, to which confidentiality of records identifying the subject will be maintained; 6.
Page 314 - ... 1 . A statement that the study involves research, an explanation of the purposes of the research and the expected duration of the subject's participation, a description of the procedures to be followed, and identification of any procedures which are experimental; 2.
Page 314 - A description of any reasonably foreseeable risks or discomforts to the subject; (3) A description of any benefits to the subject or to others which may reasonably be expected from the research: (4) A disclosure of appropriate alternative procedures or courses of treatment, if any, that might be advantageous to the subject...
Page 304 - Users' guides to the medical literature. II. How to use an article about therapy or prevention. A. Are the results of the study valid? Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group. JAMA 1993;270:2598-2601. 78. Guyatt GH, Sackett DL, Cook DJ. Users' guides to the medical literature.
Page 315 - ... rights, and whom to contact in the event of a research-related injury to the subject; and (8) A statement that participation is voluntary, refusal to participate will involve no penalty or loss of benefits to which the subject is otherwise entitled, and...
Page 314 - ... medical treatments are available if injury occurs and, if so, what they consist of, or where further information may be obtained; (7) An explanation of whom to contact for answers to pertinent questions about the research and research subjects...
Page 316 - Informed consent will be sought from each prospective subject or the subject's legally authorized representative, in accordance with, and to the extent required by 46.116.
Page 315 - IRB decides to disapprove a research activity, it shall include in its written notification a statement of the reasons for its decision and give the investigator an opportunity to respond in person or in writing. (e) An IRB shall conduct continuing review of research covered by this policy at intervals appropriate to the degree of risk, but not less than once per year, and shall have authority to observe or have a third party observe the consent process and the research.
Page 381 - The role of luteal phase support in infertility treatment: a meta-analysis of randomized trials. Fertil. Steril., 1994;61:1068-1076.
Page 367 - Donesky BW, Adashi EY. Surgically induced ovulation in the polycystic ovary syndrome: wedge resection revisited in the age of laparoscopy. Fertil Steril 1995; 63:439-463.

About the author (1998)

Judith Steinberg Turiel is a freelance medical writer with an Ed.D. from Harvard. She was the research liaison for DES Action, worked with the Coalition for the Medical Rights of Women, and is coauthor of Preventing Preterm Birth: A Parent's Guide (1988).

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