Beyond Separate Spheres: Intellectual Roots of Modern Feminism

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 1983 - Social Science - 288 pages
1 Review
"With superb insight and erudition Rosenberg discerns the connections between social science and feminism which replaced the ideal of 'true womanhood’ with 'the new woman’ at the turn of the 20th century. Besides brilliantly illuminating the personalities and ideas which led from one intellectual era to another, the book contributes groundbreaking research to the question of feminism’s fate in the 1920s."-- Nancy F. Cott
"Weaving anecdote and analysis, Rosenberg shows how the women’s experiences in academic and institutional settings influenced the direction and content of their theoretical work."-- Kathryn Kish Sklar, The Wilson Quarterly
"Brilliant and pioneering. . . . Details a fascinating chapter in American intellectual and educational history, and sensitively depicts the often painful challenges faced by women academics of an earlier age."-- Marie Marmo Mullaney, Library Journal
"Forcefully argued and gracefully written, this work . . . not only sheds new light on the intellectual roots of modern feminism, but advances an irrefutable indictment of an academic world that systematically excluded talented women from teaching posts while allowing their male mentors to lay claim to their pioneering scholarship."-- Eric Foner, Commonweal
"Fascinating. . . . Deserves the widest possible readership."-- Hamilton Cravens, Science
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

In the Shadow of Dr Clarke
1
The Feminization of Academe
28
The New Psychology and the New Woman
54
Toward a Sexless Intelligence
84
The Social Roots of Personality
114
The Primitive Side of Civilized Culture
147
The Reluctant Revolutionaries
178
Beyond Separate Spheres
207
Epilogue
238
Index
279
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information