Beyond the City Limits: Urban Policy and Economic Restructuring in Comparative Perspective

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Temple University Press, 2009 - Business & Economics - 290 pages
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This book challenges the notion that there is a single, global process of economic restructuring to which cities must submit. The studies in this volume compare urban development in the United States, Western Europe, and Japan, demonstrating that there is significant variety in urban economic restructuring. The contributors emphasize that the economic forces transforming cities from industrial concentrations to postindustrial service centers do not exist apart from politics: all nation-states are heavily involved in the restructuring process.

Contributors: Pierre Clavel, Susan Fainstein, Richard Child Hill, Nancy Kleniewski, Harvey L. Molotch, Michael Parkinson, Edmond Preteceille, Saskia Sassen, H. V. Savitch, John Walton, and the editors.
In the series "Conflicts in Urban and Regional Development," edited by John R. Logan and Todd Swanstrom.

 

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Contents

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Copyright

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Page 5 - The economic health of our nation's communities ultimately depends on the health of our nation's economy. Federal efforts to revitalize urban areas through a national urban policy concerned principally with the health of A National Urban Policy Reconsidered 98 specific places will inevitably conflict with efforts to revitalize the larger economy.
Page 10 - ... undergo these adjustments, and their "health" will often have to be appreciated at new levels of population and employment. The nation can no longer assume that cities will perform the full range of their traditional functions for the larger society. They are no longer the most desirable settings for living, working, or producing. They should be allowed to transform into more specialized service and consumption centers within larger urban economic systems. The Panel believes that this nation...
Page 10 - The nation's settlements will have to undergo these adjustments, and their "health" will often have to be appreciated at new levels of population and employment. The nation can no longer assume that cities will perform the full range of their traditional functions for the larger society. They are no longer the most desirable settings for living, working, or producing. They should be allowed to transform into more specialized service and consumption centers within larger urban economic systems. The...

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