Beyond the Limits: A Law Enforcement Guide to Speed Enforcement

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DIANE Publishing, 1994 - 114 pages
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Promotes more effective enforcement of laws and regulations governing all posted speed limits, builds public support for traffic laws, and hopes to change unsafe driving behavior. 23 appendices include: glossary, training modules, new technology, sample programs in various states, photo radar, drone radar and much more.
 

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Page 71 - Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York...
Page 111 - Official Traffic Control Devices. — All signs, signals, markings, and devices not inconsistent with this act placed or erected by authority of a public body or official having jurisdiction, for the purpose of regulating, warning, or guiding traffic.
Page 111 - All signs, signals, markings, and devices not inconsistent with this act placed or erected by authority of a public body or official having jurisdiction, for the purpose of regulating, warning, or guiding traffic. (b) Official traffic control signal. Any device, whether manually, electrically or mechanically operated, by which traffic is alternately directed to stop and to proceed. (c) Railroad sign or signal.
Page 111 - Markings — All lines, patterns, words, colors, or other devices, except signs, set into the surface of, applied upon, or attached to the pavement or curbing or to objects within or adjacent to the roadway, officially placed for the purpose of regulating, warning, or guiding traffic.
Page v - Conduct a coordinated national campaign to increase public awareness of traffic safety issues, promote improved driver training, achieve more effective driver licensing and driver records, build support for traffic safety laws, and change unsafe driving behavior.
Page 36 - The purpose of evaluation research is to measure the effects of a program against the goals it set out to accomplish as a means of contributing to subsequent decision making about the program and improving future programming
Page 97 - When traveling at a higher speed, a car moves a greater distance during the fixed period of time that it takes for the driver to react to a perceived problem; • On highways lacking adequate superelevation, a driver's ability to steer safely around curves diminishes with speed; • The distance required to stop a vehicle by braking increases with speed; and • Crash severity increases disproportionately with speed at impact.
Page 111 - Sign - A device mounted on a fixed or portable support whereby a specific message is conveyed by means of words or symbols, officially erected for the purpose of regulating, warning, or guiding traffic.
Page 5 - ... clear whether the variance of speed can be controlled independently of the average. Second, it is uncertain whether results based on cross-sectional differences will accurately predict the effects of larger differences outside the range of crosssectional variation. Nevertheless, these results suggest that measures to control the variance of speed could be an effective component of traffic control. This might mean curbing those drivers whose speed is substantially different from that of the traffic...
Page 5 - First, analysis of the 1981 - 1982 data reveals no statistically significant relationship between average speed and the fatality rate. This is true for other speed measures as well: percentage of drivers exceeding 55 mph, percentage of drivers exceeding 65 mph, and 85th percentile speed. All considered, states with high average speeds do not have higher fatality rates than states with low average speeds. Second, there is a statistically significant relationship between speed variance (the range of...

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