Big Money

Front Cover
Random House, 2008 - England - 304 pages
3 Reviews

A P.G. Wodehouse novel

Most of the big money belongs to Torquil Paterson Frisby, the dyspeptic American millionaire - but that doesn't stop him wanting more out of it. His niece, the beautiful Ann Moon, is engaged to 'Biscuit', Lord Biskerton, who doesn't have very much of the stuff and so he has to escape to Valley Fields to hide from his creditors. Meanwhile, his old schoolfriend Berry Conway, who is working for Frisby, himself falls for Ann - just as Biscuit falls for her friend Kitchie Valentine. In this typically hilarious novel by the master of light comedy, life can sometimes become a little complicated.

Oh, and Berry has been left a lot of shares in the Dream Come True copper mine. Of course they're worthless... aren't they?

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User Review  - PhilSyphe - LibraryThing

Although not one of my favourite tales to flow from the Wodehouse pen – or typewriter – it’s still good fun. If you want some light-hearted humour with a sprinkling of chaos, give this a try. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - raizel - LibraryThing

The book is fine. Justice prevails; greed is undone; falling in love at first sight works after some difficulties; falling in love later in life also works. The main difficulty seems to be the lack of ... Read full review

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About the author (2008)

Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (always known as 'Plum') wrote more than ninety novels and some three hundred short stories over 73 years. He is widely recognised as the greatest 20th-century writer of humour in the English language.

Perhaps best known for the escapades of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Wodehouse also created the world of Blandings Castle, home to Lord Emsworth and his cherished pig, the Empress of Blandings. His stories include gems concerning the irrepressible and disreputable Ukridge; Psmith, the elegant socialist; the ever-so-slightly-unscrupulous Fifth Earl of Ickenham, better known as Uncle Fred; and those related by Mr Mulliner, the charming raconteur of The Angler's Rest, and the Oldest Member at the Golf Club.

In 1936 he was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for 'having made an outstanding and lasting contribution to the happiness of the world'. He was made a Doctor of Letters by Oxford University in 1939 and in 1975, aged 93, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. He died shortly afterwards, on St Valentine's Day.

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