Bigger Isn't Always Better: The New Mindset for Real Business Growth

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AMACOM Div American Mgmt Assn, 2006 - Business & Economics - 272 pages
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When it comes to business growth, bigger is not always better. The key to achieving growth is to change the way we think about it. Genuine growth has more to do with reaching maximum potential than reaching maximum size. Based on ten years of research and dozens of personal interviews by the author, "Bigger Isn't Always Better" identifies seven key habits of mind that lead to real growth, and shows, through many examples, how they have been applied successfully.Examples include Darcy Williams at Nike, who championed a range of products for women that did not fit into the established market segments (men) of her employer; Bill Greenwood of Burlington Northern, who found a way to turn truckers, his railroad's most difficult competitors, into its best customers; Al Bru, who eliminated trans fats from Pepsico's Frito-Lay snack foods and got health-conscious consumers to embrace the products; and Jane Friedman, HarperCollins publisher, who was determined to give her company a brand identity and reduce its dependence on a few blockbuster books.Combining real-life stories and insightful analysis, "Bigger Isn't Always Better" shows how to move an organization forward -- to grow smarter, not fatter.
 

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Contents

Is Bigger Better?
11
A Bigger Stock Price Is Not Always a Good Thing
28
Growth Is About Moving Forward
48
Are You a Fixer or Grower
75
What Growers Do
97
Know Where to Look
99
Know What They Want
124
Tell The Truth
139
Create Tension to Generate Forward Movement
166
Win Hearts and Minds
184
Master Momentum and Bounce
214
Know When to Let Goand How to Share the Wealth
231
Epilogue
237
Notes
239
Index
253
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Page 1 - The problem is to get beyond the maintenance level, for "a life justifies itself only if its effort to perpetuate itself is integrated into its surpassing and if this surpassing has no other limits than those which...

About the author (2006)

ROBERT M. TOMASKO is an international management consultant associated with Arthur D. Little, Inc., and is in great demand as a speaker at business meetings around the world. Based in Washington, D.C., he is the author of two well-known books, Rethinking the Corporation and Downsizing. His clients include BellSouth, Coca-Cola, First Chicago, Hewlett-Packard, Marriott, and Toyota. He speaks at meetings of the Conference Board, President's Association, and many major industry associations.

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