Bilingual Speech: A Typology of Code-Mixing

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Dec 14, 2000 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 306 pages
0 Reviews
This book provides an in depth analysis of the different ways in which bilingual speakers switch from one language to another in the course of conversation. This phenomenon, known as code-mixing or code-switching, takes many forms. Pieter Muysken adopts a comparative approach to distinguish between the different types of code-mixing, drawing on a wealth of data from bilingual settings throughout the world. His study identifies three fundamental and distinct patterns of mixing - 'insertion', 'alternation' and 'congruent lexicalization' - and sets out to discover whether the choice of a particular mixing strategy depends on the contrasting grammatical properties of the languages involved, the degree of bilingual competence of the speaker or various social factors. The book synthesizes a vast array of recent research in a rapidly growing field of study which has much to reveal about the structure and function of language.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

2 Differences and similarities between languages
35
3 Insertion
60
4 Alternation
96
5 Congruent lexicalization
122
6 Function words
154
7 Bilingual verbs
184
8 Variation in mixing patterns
221
9 Codemixing bilingual speech language change
250
References
279
Author index
298
Subject and language index
301
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Pieter Muysken is Professor of Linguistics at Radboud University Nijmegen, after previously teaching at the universities of Amsterdam and Leiden. His specialism is language contact and he does research in the Andes, the Caribbean and the Netherlands.

Bibliographic information