Bilingual Women: Anthropological Approaches to Second Language Use

Front Cover
Bloomsbury Academic, Mar 10, 1994 - Education - 198 pages
0 Reviews

This book studies women's language use in bilingual or multi-lingual cultural situations. The authors - social anthropologists, language teachers, and interpreters cover a wide variety of geographical and linguistic situations, from the death of Gaelic in the Outer Hebrides, to the use of Spanish by Quechua and Aymara women in the Andes. Certain common themes emerge: dominant and sub-dominant languages, women's use of them; ambivalent attitudes towards women as translators, interpreters and writers in English as a second language; and the critical role of women in the survival (or death) of minority languages such as Gaelic and Breton.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1994)

Edited by Pauline Burton, Lecturer in the Division of Humanities and Social Sciences, City Polytechnic of Hong Kong, Ketaki Kushari, Dyson Writer and Research Associate, Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women, University of Oxford and Shirley Ardener, Centre for Cross-Cultural Research on Women, University of Oxford.

Bibliographic information