Biodiversity Dynamics: Turnover of Populations, Taxa, and Communities

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Columbia University Press, 1998 - Nature - 528 pages
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How will patterns of human interaction with the earth's ecosystem impact biodiversity loss over the long term - not in the next ten or even fifty years, but on the vast temporal scale dealt with by earth scientists? The contributors to Biodiversity Dynamics bring together the cutting-edge findings of a number of different fields that have traditionally had little crossover: data from population biology, community ecology, comparative biology, and paleontology are all presented. Where paleontologists and ecologists have long had divergent perspectives, Biodiversity Dynamics seeks a middle ground, finding ways for both scientific communities to work together to comprehend the great biodiversity of the earth and how to preserve it for future generations.
 

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Contents

Do Taxa Persist as Merapopulations in Evolutionary Time?
19
Derecting Ecological Partern in Phylogenies
51
Testing Models of Speciation and Extinction with Phylogeneric
70
Dynamics of Diversification in Srate Space
91
Parterns and Processes in
109
The Role of Development in Evolutionary Radiations
132
Evolutionary Tutnover and Volatility in Higher Taxa
161
A Hierarchical View of Srasis and Change
187
Scales of Diversification and the Ordovician Radiation
288
The Accumulation of Species
311
An Intermediate Distutbance Hyporhesis of Maximal Speciation
349
Tutnover Dynamics Across Ecological and Geological Scales
377
Carastrophic Fluctuations in Nuttient Levels as an Agent of Mass
405
ScaleIndependent Interprerations of Macroevolutionary Dynamics
430
REFERENCES
451
Schopf Museum of Comparative Zoology Harvard Univer
480

Processes and Implications
212
Equilibtial Diversity Dynamics in North Ametican Mammals
232

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About the author (1998)

Michael L. McKinney is professor of geology at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.

James A. Drake is an associate professor in the Department of Zoology and the Graduate Ecology Program at the University of Tennessee.

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