Biographical Sketch of Linton Stephens: (late Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia)

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James D. Waddell
Dodson & Scott, 1877 - Judges - 434 pages
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Page 397 - Leaves have their time to fall, And flowers to wither at the north wind's breath, And stars to set — but all, Thou hast all seasons for thine own, O Death ! We know when moons shall wane, When summer birds from far shall cross the sea.
Page 272 - When ranting round in pleasure's ring, Religion may be blinded ; Or if she gie a random sting, It may be little minded ; But when on life we're tempest-driv'n, A conscience but a canker — A correspondence fix'd wi...
Page 369 - Auld Nature swears, the lovely dears Her noblest work she classes, O : Her 'prentice han' she try'd on man, An
Page 333 - SECTION 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. SEC. 2. The congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
Page 12 - When science self destroy'd her favourite son ! Yes ! she too much indulged thy fond pursuit, She sow'd the seeds, but death has reap'd the fruit. 'Twas thine own genius gave the final blow, And help'd to plant the wound that laid thee low. So the struck eagle...
Page 266 - ... whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute a new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness.
Page 400 - Look up, my lord. Kent. Vex not his ghost. O, let him pass! He hates him That would upon the rack of this tough world Stretch him out longer.
Page 12 - Twas thine own genius gave the final blow, And help'd to plant the wound that laid thee low : So the struck eagle, stretch'd upon the plain, No more through rolling clouds to soar again, View'd his own feather on the fatal dart, And wing'd the shaft that quiver'd in his heart; Keen were his pangs, but keener far to feel He nursed the pinion which impell'd the steel ; While the same plumage that had warm'd his nest Drank the last life-drop of his bleeding breast.
Page 272 - The fear o' hell's a hangman's whip To haud the wretch in order ; But where ye feel your honour grip, Let that aye be your border ; Its slightest touches, instant pause — Debar a' side pretences ; And resolutely keep its laws, Uncaring consequences.
Page 338 - ... shall have paid all taxes which may have been required of him, and which he may have had an opportunity of paying, agreeably to law, for the year next preceding the election...

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