Bioinstrumentation

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Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2006 - Medical - 212 pages
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This short book provides basic information about bioinstrumentation and electric circuit theory. Many biomedical instruments use a transducer or sensor to convert a signal created by the body into an electric signal. Our goal here is to develop expertise in electric circuit theory applied to bioinstrumentation. We begin with a description of variables used in circuit theory, charge, current, voltage, power and energy. Next, Kirchhoff's current and voltage laws are introduced, followed by resistance, simplifications of resistive circuits and voltage and current calculations. Circuit analysis techniques are then presented, followed by inductance and capacitance, and solutions of circuits using the differential equation method. Finally, the operational amplifier and time varying signals are introduced. This lecture is written for a student or researcher or engineer who has completed the first two years of an engineering program (i.e., 3 semesters of calculus and differential equations). A considerable effort has been made to develop the theory in a logical manner developing special mathematical skills as needed. At the end of the short book is a wide selection of problems, ranging from simple to complex."
 

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Contents

I
1
III
5
IV
7
VI
9
VII
11
VIII
12
IX
13
X
14
XXVIII
59
XXIX
63
XXXI
67
XXXII
71
XXXIV
76
XXXV
79
XXXVII
89
XXXIX
96

XI
17
XIV
19
XV
22
XVI
23
XVII
24
XVIII
26
XX
27
XXI
31
XXII
39
XXIII
44
XXV
48
XXVI
53
XXVII
56
XL
111
XLI
119
XLII
130
XLIII
133
XLIV
134
XLV
135
XLVI
137
XLVII
141
XLVIII
153
XLIX
154
L
157
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Page 17 - To follow this discussion, the student must first grasp certain fundamental concepts of circuit analysis. It is hoped that a brief review of the concepts here employed will facilitate such an understanding.
Page 11 - Fig. 3.5, the voltage, <v, between two points (A and B), is the amount of energy required to move a charge from point A to point B.

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