Biometrics

Front Cover
McGraw Hill Professional, Dec 19, 2002 - Computers - 464 pages
Discover how to make biometrics -- the technology involving scanning and analyzing unique body characteristics and matching them against information stored in a database -- a part of your overall security plan with this hands-on guide. Includes deployment scenarios, cost analysis, privacy issues, and much more.
 

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Biometrics, iris e outras formas de ser reconhecido num computador

Contents

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Page 246 - personal data" shall mean any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person ("data subject"); an identifiable person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identification number or to one or more factors specific to his physical, physiological, mental, economic, cultural or social identity...
Page xxxix - Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (USA Patriot Act) was enacted on October 26, 2001.
Page 242 - ... (10) establish appropriate administrative, technical, and physical safeguards to insure the security and confidentiality of records and to protect against any anticipated threats or hazards to their security or integrity which could result in substantial harm, embarrassment, inconvenience, or unfairness to any individual on whom information is maintained...
Page 27 - And Jacob went near unto Isaac his father : and he felt him, and said, The voice is Jacob's voice, but the hands are the hands of Esau.
Page 279 - Any organization creating, maintaining, using, or disseminating records of personally identifiable information must assure the reliability of the data for its intended use and must take precautions to prevent misuse...
Page 229 - Unquestionably, some individuals' concern for their own privacy may lead them to avoid or to postpone needed medical attention. Nevertheless, disclosures of private medical information to doctors, to hospital personnel, to insurance companies, and to public health agencies are often an essential part of modern medical practice even when the disclosure may reflect unfavorably on the character of the patient.

About the author (2002)

John Woodward is a senior policy analyst at RAND where he works on national security, intelligence, and technology policy issues. He is particularly interested in biometrics and surveillance technologies. He has testified about these technologies before Congress and the congressionally created Commission on Online Child Protection. Prior to joining RAND full-time in 2000, Mr. Woodward served as an Operations Officer for the Central Intelligence Agency for twelve years. His overseas assignments included tours in East Asia and East Africa. Mr. Woodward received his Juris Doctor degree magna cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C. He was a Thouron Scholar at the London School of Economics, University of London, where he received his M.S. in Economics. He received his B.S. in Economics from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He served as a law clerk to the Hon. Roderick R. McKelvie, a U.S. District Court Judge in Wilmington, Delaware.

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