Biophysical Tools for Biologists: In Vivo Techniques

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Academic Press, Jan 19, 2009 - Science - 704 pages
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Driven in part by the development of genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics as new disciplines, there has been a tremendous resurgence of interest in physical methods to investigate macromolecular structure and function in the context of living cells. This volume in Methods in Cell Biology is devoted to biophysical techniques in vivo and their applications to cellular biology. The volume covers methods-oriented chapters on fundamental as well as cutting-edge techniques in molecular and cellular biophysics. This book is directed toward the broad audience of cell biologists, biophysicists, pharmacologists, and molecular biologists who employ classical and modern biophysical technologies or wish to expand their expertise to include such approaches. It will also interest the biomedical and biotechnology communities for biophysical characterization of drug formulations prior to FDA approval.

* Describes techniques in the context of important biological problems
* Delineates critical steps and potential pitfalls for each method
 

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Contents

Microscopic Methods
93
Methods at the In VitroIn Vivo Interface
359
Methods for Diffusion Viscosity Force and Displacement
409
Techniques for Protein Activity and ProteinProtein Interactions
539
Computational Modeling
599
Index
653
Volumes in Series
669
Color Plate Section
679
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About the author (2009)

Professor of Biochemistry and Marine Biology at Northeastern University, promoted 1996. Joined Northeastern faculty in 1987. Previously a faculty member in Dept. of Biochemistry at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, 1983-1987.Principal Investigator in the U.S. Antarctic Program since 1984. Twelve field seasons "on the ice" since 1981. Research conducted at Palmer Station, Antarctica, and McMurdo Station, Antarctica.Research areas: Biochemical, cellular, and physiological adaptation to low and high temperatures. Structure and function of cytoplasmic microtubules and microtubule-dependent motors from cold-adapted Antarctic fishes. Regulation of tubulin and globin gene expression in zebrafish and Antarctic fishes. Role of microtubules in morphogenesis of the zebrafish embryo. Developmental hemapoiesis in zebrafish and Antarctic fishes. UV-induced DNA damage and repair in Antarctic marine organisms.

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