Biostatistics: A Methodology For the Health Sciences

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John Wiley & Sons, Oct 20, 2004 - Medical - 896 pages
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A respected introduction to biostatistics, thoroughly updated and revised

The first edition of Biostatistics: A Methodology for the Health Sciences has served professionals and students alike as a leading resource for learning how to apply statistical methods to the biomedical sciences. This substantially revised Second Edition brings the book into the twenty-first century for today’s aspiring and practicing medical scientist.

This versatile reference provides a wide-ranging look at basic and advanced biostatistical concepts and methods in a format calibrated to individual interests and levels of proficiency. Written with an eye toward the use of computer applications, the book examines the design of medical studies, descriptive statistics, and introductory ideas of probability theory and statistical inference; explores more advanced statistical methods; and illustrates important current uses of biostatistics.

New to this edition are discussions of

  • Longitudinal data analysis
  • Randomized clinical trials
  • Bayesian statistics
  • GEE
  • The bootstrap method

Enhanced by a companion Web site providing data sets, selected problems and solutions, and examples from such current topics as HIV/AIDS, this is a thoroughly current, comprehensive introduction to the field.

 

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Contents

4 Statistical Inference Populations and Samples
61
5 One and TwoSample Inference
117
6 Counting Data
151
7 Categorical Data Contingency Tables
208
8 Nonparametric DistributionFree and Permutation Models Robust Procedures
253
9 Association and Prediction Linear Models with One Predictor Variable
291
10 Analysis of Variance
357
11 Association and Prediction Multiple Regression Analysis and Linear Models with Multiple Predictor Variables
428
15 Rates and Proportions
640
16 Analysis of the Time to an Event Survival Analysis
661
17 Sample Sizes for Observational Studies
709
18 Longitudinal Data Analysis
728
19 Randomized Clinical Trials
766
20 Personal Postscript
787
Appendix
817
Author Index
841

12 Multiple Comparisons
520
13 Discrimination and Classification
550
14 Principal Component Analysis and Factor Analysis
584

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About the author (2004)

GERALD VAN BELLE is a professor in the Departments of Biostatistics and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. He is the author of four books as well as more than 100 articles and numerous book chapters.

LLOYD D. FISHER is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Washington, Seattle, and a consultant to the drug and device industries. He has held positions with the Center for AIDS Research, the Mayo Clinic, and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, among others.

PATRICK J. HEAGERTY is an associate professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Washington in Seattle and an associate member at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

THOMAS LUMLEY is an associate professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Washington in Seattle.

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