Biotic Homogenization

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Julie L. Lockwood, Michael L. McKinney
Springer Science & Business Media, May 31, 2001 - Nature - 289 pages
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Biological homogenization is the dominant process shaping the future global biosphere. As global transportation becomes faster and more frequent, it is inevitable that biotic intermixing will increase. Unique local biotas will become extinct only to be replaced by already widespread biotas that can tolerate human activities. This process is affecting all aspects of our world: language, economies, and ecosystems alike. The ultimate outcome is the loss of uniqueness and the growth of uniformity. In this way, fast food restaurants exist in Moscow and Java Sparrows breed on Hawaii.
Biological homogenization qualifies as a global environmental catastrophe. The Earth has never witnessed such a broad and complete reorganization of species distributions.
 

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Contents

Biotic Homogenization A Sequential and Selective Process
1
Biotic Homogenization Lessons from the Past
19
Birds and Butterflies Along Urban Gradients in Two Ecoregions of the United States Is Urbanization Creating a Homogeneous Fauna?
33
Rarity and Phylogeny in Birds
57
Hybridization Between Native and Alien Plants and its Consequences
81
Taxonomic Selectivity in Surviving Introduced Insects in the United States
103
Are Unsuccessful Avian Invaders Rarer in Their Native Range Than Successful Invaders?
125
A Geographical Perspective on the Biotic Homogenization Process Implications from the Macroecology of North American Birds
157
Global Warming Temperature Homogenization and Species Extinction
179
The History and Ecological Basis of Extinction and Speciation in Birds
201
Downsizing Nature Anthropogenic Dwarfing of Species and Ecosystems
223
Spatial Homogenization of the Aquatic Fauna of Tennessee Extinction and Invasion Following Land Use Change and Habitat Alteration
245
Homogenization of Californias Fish Fauna Through Abiotic Change
259
Contributors
279
INDEX
283
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About the author (2001)

Julie L. Lockwood is Professor and Director of the Graduate Program in Ecology and Evolution at Rutgers University. Her research interests emphasise how species invasions and extinctions combine to shape present-day biodiversity patterns, with focus on the dynamics of small populations.