Bird Nests and Construction Behaviour

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Aug 31, 2000 - Science
Bird Nests and Construction Behaviour provides a broad view of our understanding of the biology of the nests, bowers and tools made by birds. It illustrates how, among vertebrates, the building abilities of birds are more impressive and consistent than for any other builders other than ourselves, yet birds seem to require no special equipment, and use quite uncomplicated behaviour. In doing so, the book raises general issues in the field of behavioural ecology including the costs of reproduction, sexual selection and the organisation and complexity of behaviour. Written for students and researchers of animal behaviour, behavioural ecology and ornithology, it will nevertheless make fascinating reading for architects and engineers interested in understanding how structures are created by animals.
 

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Contents

Animal builders and the importance of bird nests
1
12 Builders extend their control
2
13 The extended phenotype concept
5
14 Building behaviour changes habitats
8
15 Exploitation of the resources by others
10
17 The builders
12
18 Are there shared characters among builders?
14
b No specialist anatomy
16
e Silk
112
f Grass
114
g Sticks
116
h Design and convergence
118
55 The nest lining
119
a The presence number and type of lining materials
121
b The function of linings
122
The cost of nest building
125

19 Chapter by chapter
20
110 The taxonomic convention
22
The clutchnest relationship
23
23 Why do birds lay eggs?
27
24 Do chicks need nests?
28
25 Clutch size
31
26 The nest and clutch size
35
Standardising the nest description
39
32 Nest identification morphometrics and type
41
b Nest weight and dimensions
42
c Nest shape
43
e Nest attachment
43
33 The four nest zones
47
34 The materials
49
a Inorganic materials
50
c Plant lichen and fungal materials
52
d Others
54
35 Additional information
55
b Adults and young
56
d Special features and comments
57
Construction
58
42 Types of construction method
60
43 Sculpting
61
44 Moulding
62
45 Piling up
65
46 Sticking together
68
47 Interlocking
69
b Stitches and poprivets
71
c Velcro
72
48 Weaving
78
49 How difficult is nest building?
82
410 Tool use and tool making
87
The functional architecture of the nest
91
52 The outer nest layer
93
c Snake skin
99
d Heads and tails
101
53 Nest attachment
103
b Attachment type and nest support diameter
103
54 The structural nest layer
108
a Nest weight and nest design in relation to bird weight
109
b Number of materials in the structural layer
110
c Associations of materials
111
62 Calculation of energetic costs
127
63 Gathering journeys and building time
128
64 Measurement of building costs as clutch reduction
130
65 Other evidence of nest building cost
131
66 Taking over the nest of another bird
134
67 The consequences of nest reuse
137
68 Indicators of the cost of nest reuse
138
69 The response of nest reusers to bloodfeeding ectoparasites
141
The selection of a nest site
146
72 The availability of nest material
147
73 The influence of physical factors
150
74 The influence of predators
152
75 Predation rates
159
76 Coloniality and nest defence
161
77 Sites exploiting the nest defence of other birds
163
78 Nest sites associated with arthropods
166
a Caterpillars and spiders
167
b Social insects
169
79 Birds and termites
170
710 Birds and ants
171
711 Birds and bees
175
Bowers building quality and mate assessment
180
82 Sexual selection
181
83 Nest building and sexual selection
183
84 Court displays and male quality
185
85 Bowers and mate assessment
189
c The avenue builders
193
d Functional design and bower evolution
199
86 Bowers and sexual selection theory
204
87 Beautiful bowers?
206
The evolution of nest building
211
92 Innovations of design and of technology
216
93 Taxonomic characters from nests
218
94 Variability and conservatism
220
95 Weaver birds and the ecology of nest evolution
223
96 The Tyrannidae and the flexibility of building behaviour
225
References
231
Author index
259
General index
263
Species index
267
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