Bird Migration in Great Britain and Ireland ...

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J. Murray, 1896 - Birds - 27 pages
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Page 3 - More, for the purpose of obtaining (with the consent of the Master and Elder Brethren of the Trinity House, the Commissioners of Northern Lights, and the Commissioners of Irish Lights...
Page 12 - Ireland during the more pronounced west coast emigratory flights. Independently of, and in addition to, these main Irish migratory movements, Thrushes, Larks, and Starlings occur in October and November on the northern coasts of Ireland from Tory Island to the Maidens as immigrants from Scotland. These are to be correlated with movements of the same species observed at the Rhinns of Islay and the Wigton coast. Larks, too, are often recorded for this route during the daytime. There are also autumnal...
Page 9 - There are no essentially northern species recorded for this route, and the occurrence of the Rook so frequently and in such numbers is suggestive of a Central (Western) European source. southerly and westerly journeys were performed. Thus in the spring these birds depart from the same sections of our eastern seaboard as witnessed their arrival in the autumn. Intermigration between Heligoland and Britain. — Much prominence has been given in some of the Annual Reports issued by the Committee, and...
Page 7 - ... stretch of coast-line, but such, is not infrequently the case. Indeed, as a rule, they are recorded from the greater part of the region indicated. It is possible to define the. southern limit on the coast at which these birds strike Britain, with a considerable degree of precision. No section of the British coast is so well equipped with light-stations as that which lies between the north coast of Norfolk and Dungeness. In addition to an average number of lighthouses, there is a fleet of lightships...
Page 23 - ... the formation of the anticyclone is another incentive, and it is not surprising that there is a rush southwards as soon as the weather becomes favourable. The gentle pressure gradients do not always extend entirely across the North Sea, and the emigrants may fall in with bad weather before they reach our shores. If the western cyclonic system is too close to Britain, or if the depression is exceptionally deep, strong winds prevail on the eastern coasts, and the birds perform the latter part of...
Page 10 - ... for the autumn. The movements of these groups of migrants will be treated of under the various sections of our coasts. The first movement on the part of all emigrants among British birds is to the coast, which is reached in some cases, no doubt, by particular inland routes. East Coast of Great Britain. — The emigratory movements on the east coast are very simple in their geographical aspect. When the coast is reached, the emigrants follow the coastline southward, gathering strength as they...
Page 8 - They are renewed during winter on occasions of exceptionally severe cold, but the birds then pass to the westward along our southern shores. There are some remarkable features associated with these movements ~ (1) They are frequently observed for several or many consecutive days; (2) they often occur when there is an almost entire absence of birdmigration on other parts o'f our shores ; (3) the movements appear to be entirely confined to the daytime, and are usually timed as from soon after daylight...
Page 5 - ... directly in the course of the legions of migratory birds which annually make a double journey between their northern summer and their southern winter quarters. For these Birds of Passage our shores form not only a main and much accustomed highway, but afford convenient resting quarters. Secondly, our Islands have a vast bird -population of their own, and the majority of these birds belong to purely migratory species. Some of them are either Summer Visitors from the southern regions or Winter...
Page 19 - Plovers of various species, on our southern coast quite down to the end of the month, some of their movements being very marked. These are undoubtedly birds of passage, on their way to northern summer haunts beyond the limits of the British Isles, for our own birds of the same species are then busily engaged in incubation or tending their young. During the first half of JUNE several species whose breeding range extends to the Polar regions appear in considerable numbers on our shores on their way...

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