Birth and Fortune: The Impact of Numbers on Personal Welfare

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University of Chicago Press, Apr 15, 1987 - Business & Economics - 228 pages
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In this influential work, Richard A. Easterlin shows how the size of a generation—the number of persons born in a particular year—directly and indirectly affects the personal welfare of its members, the make-up and breakdown of the family, and the general well being of the economy.

"[Easterlin] has made clear, I think unambiguously, that the baby-boom generation is economically underprivileged merely because of its size. And in showing this, he demonstrates that population size can be as restrictive as a factor as sex, race, or class on equality of opportunity in the U.S."—Jeffrey Madrick, Business Week
 

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Contents

Generation Size
3
The Economic Fortunes of Young Adults
15
II
32
Womens Work
60
Breakdown of the Family?
79
Social Disorganization
97
Stagflation
112
The Future
131
Conclusion
145
Epilogue
165
NOTES
203
INDEX
220
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About the author (1987)

Richard A. Easterlin is professor of economics at the University of Southern California.

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