Bitten: True Medical Stories of Bites and Stings

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Macmillan, Sep 1, 2005 - Medical - 368 pages
3 Reviews

STARTLING TRUE CASES OF BITE ATTACKS, RESULTING INFECTIONS, AND ENSUING TREATMENTS---
From ticks, ants, and flying bats to elephant seals, Komodo dragons, rhesus macaques, and deadliest of all, humans.

We've all been bitten. And we all have stories.
The bite attacks that Pamela Nagami, M.D., has chosen to write about in Bitten take place in big cities, small towns, and remote villages around the world and throughout history, locales as familiar as New York or Hollywood, or exotic as Africa, the Middle East, or Indonesia. They include a six-year-old girl who descended into weeks of extreme lassitude from a tick bite; a diabetic in the West Indies who awoke to find a rat eating two of his toes; a California man who developed "flesh-eating strep" following a penile bite; and more.
With reports from medical journals, case histories, colleagues, and her own twenty-five-year career as a practicing physician and infectious diseases specialist, Pamela Nagami offers readers intrigued by infection, disease, and mesmerized by creatures in the wild a compulsively readable narrative that is entertaining, sometimes disturbing, and always engrossing.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Helcura - LibraryThing

This book is like a tray of hors d'oeuvres, lots of tasty little bites of things and a few that you would really like an entire plate of. Covering medical cases of things that bite from ants to humans ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - slug9000 - LibraryThing

This book started out very strongly, with chapters on spiders and snakes. I read these sections with horrified amazement. I will echo what another reader said: Do not read the first few chapters in ... Read full review

Contents

Conclusion
287
References
297

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Page 323 - Onset of espundia after many years of occult infection with Leishmania braziliensis.

About the author (2005)

Pamela Nagami, M.D., is a practicing physician in internal medicine and infectious diseases and a clinical associate professor of medicine at The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She lives with her husband in Encino, California.

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