Black People and the South African War 1899-1902

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Cambridge University Press, May 5, 1983 - History - 226 pages
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The South African War was a costly and bitterly contested struggle. It was fought in a region populated by five million people, four million of whom were black. This is the first history of the war to focus upon the wartime experiences of black people, and to examine the war in the context of a complex and rapidly changing colonial society increasingly shaped, but not yet transformed, by mining capital. The ways in which the war influenced the lives and livelihoods of different sections of the black population are studied - from chiefs and newspaper editors to peasant farmers and artisans, to farm tenants and industrial workers. Dr Warwick shows that black people were far more than either spectators to, or passive victims of, a white man's quarrel, and presents a thorough revision of accepted views on the war. He reveals the vital roles performed by black people in both the British and Boer armies, and shows how the regular and irregular participation of blacks exercised an influence upon the course of war.
 

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Contents

Myth of a white mans war
6
Mafikeng and beyond
28
The Bechuanaland Protectorate and Western Transvaal
29
Mafikeng besieged
32
An encircling struggle
52
Basutoland
57
The Zulus war
75
Zululand
81
Transkei and East Griqualand
118
Black workers
125
Refugees
145
Adult male workers recruited from the black concentration camps in
150
Death rates in the black concentration camps June 1901May 1902
151
Black refugees in Natal December 1901June 1902
158
Aftermath
163
Conclusion
177

Allies and neutrals
96
The Pedi heartland
99
Swaziland
105
The war in the Cape
110
The Cape Colony
113
Notes
185
Select bibliography
212
Index
221
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