Black Presidential Politics in America: A Strategic Approach

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1988 - Political Science - 255 pages
This book focuses exclusively on the question of how Blacks have used presidential elections to exercise political influence. Setting forth the argument that Blacks use the electoral system differently from other groups to achieve their social, political, and economic goals, the work analyzes the tactics employed. It looks at Black participation in the politics of the primaries, party conventions, and the general elections, showing that what happens is the result of both traditional behind-the-scenes bargaining (dependent leverage) and the more recent direct entry of Blacks into the presidential selection process as candidates (independent leverage).

Walters deals with the most significant topics in Black politics studies and electoral studies in general: the prospects for Blacks within the Democratic party, the function of Black presidential candidacies, the independent political movement in presidential elections, the impact of conservatism on Black presidential strategies, and the role of Black elected officials in presidential politics. Understanding the activities and objectives of key voting constituencies, such as Blacks, allows one to understand the dynamics of American presidential elections.
 

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Black presidential politics in America: a strategic approach

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As an activist and scholar, Walters examines black involvement in presidential politics in terms of balance-of-power politics and independent and dependent leverage strategies. Walters believes that ... Read full review

Contents

The Evolution of Black Electoral Theory
1
Dependent and IndependentLeverage
19
Conclusion
24
The Balance of Power and DependentLeverage
27
Demographics
36
The New Movement
42
Conclusion
49
The Strategy of Political Integration
52
IntraParty Presidential Politics
115
InterParty Presidential Politics
121
Options
128
Conclusions
137
InterParty Scenarios The Black Independent Party
139
The National Black Political Assembly
143
The National Black Independent Political Party
148
Discussion
150

The Struggle for Inclusion
53
The National Party
65
The Primaries
68
The Conventions
73
Conclusion
83
The Black AgendaBuilding Process
85
The Gary Convention
86
Charlotte 1976
94
Richmond 1980
96
Discussion
101
Conclusion
107
IndependentLeverage Strategies
110
The Strategy of IndependentLeverage
112
Conclusion
153
IntraParty Scenarios the Jackson Campaign for the Democratic Party Presidential Nomination
159
The TwoBallot Strategic Scenario
167
Conclusion
178
Leverage Strategies and the Future of Black Politics
184
Beyond Leverage Stratgies
198
Conclusion
205
The Howard University Black Delegate Survey
209
Notes
223
Bibliography
243
Index
247
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Ronald W. Walters is Professor of Political Science at Howard University. He was an active participant in many of the events examined in this work.

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