Black Children: Their Roots, Culture, and Learning Styles

Front Cover
JHU Press, 1982 - Education - 215 pages
2 Reviews
American educators have largely failed to recognize the crucial significance of culture in the education of African-American children, contends Janic E. Hale in the revised edition of her groundbreaking work, "Black Children." As African-American children are acculturated at home and in the African-American community, they develop cognitive patterns and behaviors that may prove incompatible with the school environment. Cultural factors produce group differences that must be addressed in the educational process. Drawing on the fields of anthropology, sociology, history, and psychology, Hale explores the effects of African-American culture on a child's intellectual devlopment and suggests curricular reforms that would allow African-American children to develop their intelligence, pursue their strengths, and succeed in school and at work.
 

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While I was searching for materials to write my Masters thesis, I stumbled upon this book. This is an outstanding work and well articulated on the miseducation of African American children. Ms. Hales, research will serve as a beacon for students who wish to uderstand the blatant offence against African American students in the educational system of the united states. Thank you Ms. Hale for your research and your diligence in your pursuit of higher educatio for African American students.
DKT
 

Contents

Introduction
1
How Culture Shapes Cognition
21
Culture and ChildRearing
45
Play Behavior as an Indicator
89
The Humanities as
101
Interviews
111
Toward a Curriculum Relevant
151
Epilogue
177
Bibliography
199
Index
209
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