Black Metropolis: A Study of Negro Life in a Northern City, Volume 1

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University of Chicago Press, 1970 - History - 858 pages
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Ground-breaking when first published in 1945, Black Metropolis remains a landmark study of race and urban life. Based on a mass of research conducted by Works Progress Administration field workers in the late 1930s, it is a historical and sociological account of the people of Chicago's South Side, the classic urban ghetto. Drake and Cayton's findings not only offer a generalized analysis of black migration, settlement, community structure, and black-white race relations in the early part of the twentieth century, but also tell us what has changed in the last hundred years and what has not. This edition includes the original Introduction by Richard Wright and a new Foreword by William Julius Wilson.

"Black Metropolis is a rare combination of research and synthesis, a book to be deeply pondered. . . . No one who reads it intelligently can ever believe again that our racial dilemma can be solved by pushing buttons, or by gradual processes which may reach four or five hundred years into the future."—Bucklin Moon, The Nation

"This volume makes a great contribution to the building of the future American and the free world."—Louis Wirth, New York Times

"By virtue of its range, its labor and its insight, the book seems certain to become a landmark not only in race studies but in the broader field of social anthropology."—Thomas Sancton, New Republic
 

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Contents

Midwest Metropolis
3
Flight to Freedom
31
Land of Promise
46
The Great Migration
58
Race Riot and Aftermath
65
Between Two Wars
77
Along the ColorLine
99
Crossing the ColorLine
129
The Measure of the Man
495
Style of Living Upper Class
526
Lower Class Sex and Family
564
The World of the Lower Class
600
The Middleclass Way of Life
658
Advancing the Race
716
Of Things to Come
755
A Methodological Note
769

The Black Ghetto
174
The Job Ceiling
214
The Shifting Line of Color
263
Democracy and Economic Necessity Breaking the Job Ceiling
287
Democracy and Economic Necessity Workers and the New Unions
312
Democracy and Political Expediency
342
Bronzeville
379
The Power of Press and Pulpit
398
Negro Business Myth and Fact
430
Business Under a Cloud
470
Notes and Documentation
783
Bronzeville 1961
793
Black Metropolis 1961
807
Postscript 1969
826
A List of Selected Books Dealing with the American Negro
837
Suggestions for Collateral Reading 1962
841
Suggestions for Collateral Reading 1969
843
Index
846
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About the author (1970)

John Gibbs St. Clair Drake (1911-90) was a sociologist and anthropologist who founded African American Studies programs at Roosevelt University and Stanford University. His books included Social Work in West Africa, Race Relations in a Time of Rapid Social Change, and Black Religion and the Redemption of Africa.

Horace R. Cayton (1903-70) was an American sociologist known for his studies of working class black Americans, particularly in mid-twentieth-century Chicago. His books included Black Workers and the New Unions and Long Old Road--An Autobiography.

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