Black theology: a documentary history, 1966-1979

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Orbis Books, 1979 - Religion - 657 pages
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Contents

General Introduction
1
Introduction
15
Black Power
23
The American Dilemma 1966
31
The Church and the Urban Crisis
43
Urban Mission in a Time of Crisis
62
The Black Manifesto
80
The National Committee of Black Churchmens
90
What Black Christian Nationalism Teaches x
329
Black Theology in 1976
340
Go From Here?
350
Introduction
363
Triple Jeopardy
377
A Comparative
398
Black Theology and the Black Woman
418
In Search of Our Mothers Gardens
434

Black Theology
100
The Black Declaration of Independence July 4 1970
108
PART III
133
Black Theology and Christian Theology
144
Why Black Theology?
152
Black Theology of Liberation
174
About Black Theology
183
What Have
193
Currents and Crosscurrents in South African Black
220
Introduction
241
The Basic Theological Position of the National Baptist
257
The Black Paper 1968
268
The Episcopal Address to the 27th General Conference
280
A Critical Assessment and
288
The Episcopal Address to the 40th Quadrennial General
296
The New Black Evangelicals
302
Factors in the Origin and Focus of the National Black
310
Introduction
445
Black Theology and African Theology
463
Soul Mates or Antagonists?
483
v45 A Black American Perspective on the Future of African
492
Communique PanAfrican Conference of Third World
503
Black Theology and Latin American Liberation
510
Black Theology and Liberation Theology
516
Statement from the Coalition of U S Nonwhite Racial
529
Final Document of the Cuba Conference on Evangeli
543
Black Theology and Marxist Thought
552
The Black Experience of the Exodus
568
Final Statement Asian Theological Conference
584
The New Context of Black Theology in the United
602
An Interpretation of the Debate among Black
609
An Annotated Bibliography of Black Theology
624
Index
639
Copyright

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About the author (1979)

A leading African American theologian and an advocate of black theology, James H. Cone was born in Fordyce, Arkansas. Cone came of age during the civil rights movement and he was drawn to the black power movement that gained prominence in the late 1960s. Rejecting the nonviolence of Martin Luther King, Jr., Cone moved to join theology with the militant, separatist vision of Malcolm X, with its espousal of forceful societal change to achieve racial equality. Cone's book Black Theology and Black Power (1969) eloquently equated black power with the political and spiritual liberation of black Americans. In it, he equated blackness as symbolic of oppression and whiteness as symbolic of the oppressors. Cone continued his teachings of what soon became known as "black theology" in a second book, A Black Theology of Liberation (1971), which strongly condemned racism and oppression. During the 1970s, Cone became a force in the development of liberation theologies in Third World countries. Beginning in 1976, he became an important figure in the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians. Cone's association with liberation theologies also broadened and transformed his vision of Christian theology. In Crosscurrents, published in 1977, he strongly articulated the view that Christian theology must move beyond reaction to white racism in America. Cone joined the faculty of Union Theological Seminary in 1969 and was appointed to the distinguished Charles A. Biggs chair of systematic theology in 1977.

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