Blacked Out: Government Secrecy in the Information Age

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 30, 2006 - Law
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Nearly forty years ago the US Congress passed the landmark Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) giving the public the right to government documents. This 'right to know' has been used over the past decades to challenge overreaching Presidents and secretive government agencies. The example of transparency in government has served as an example to nations around the world spawning similar statutes in fifty-nine countries. This 2006 book examines the evolution of the move toward openness in government. It looks at how technology has aided the disclosure and dissemination of information. The author tackles the question of whether the drive for transparency has stemmed the desire for government secrecy and discusses how many governments ignore or frustrate the legal requirements for the release of key documents. Blacked Out is an important contribution during a time where profound changes in the structure of government are changing access to government documents.
 

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Blacked out: government secrecy in the information age

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The conflict between expanding national security measures and preserving civil rights gets an extended examination in this timely history of the right to know. Lawyer and public policy scholar Roberts ... Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
27
IV
51
V
82
VI
107
VII
125
VIII
127
IX
150
X
171
XI
197
XII
199
XIII
229
XIV
231
XV
239
XVI
303
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About the author (2006)

Alasdair Roberts is the Rappaport Professor of Law and Public Policy at Suffolk University Law School. He is also an Honorary Research Fellow of the Department of Political Science, University College London. He received his law degree from the University of Toronto and a PhD in Public Policy from Harvard University. His research focuses on two areas: public sector restructuring and open government.

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