Blake, Deleuzian Aesthetics, and the Digital

Front Cover
Bloomsbury Publishing, Jan 12, 2012 - Literary Criticism - 200 pages
0 Reviews
Drawing on recent theories of digital media and on the materiality of words and images, this fascinating study makes three original claims about the work of William Blake.

First, Blake offers a critique of digital media. His poetry and method of illuminated printing is directed towards uncovering an analogical language. Second, Blake's work can be read as a performative. Finally, Blake's work is at one and the same time immanent and transcendent, aiming to return all forms of divinity and the sacred to the human imagination, stressing that ‘all deities reside in the human breast,' but it also stresses that the human has powers or potentials that transcend experience and judgement: deities reside in the human breast.

These three claims are explored through the concept of incarnation: the incarnation of ideas in words and images, the incarnation of words in material books and their copies, the incarnation of human actions and events in bodies, and the incarnation of spirit in matter.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter 1 Media Mediation and Materiality
1
Analog Language
17
Chapter 3 Incarnation
45
Chapter 4 Force and Form
59
Chapter 5 The Body of Work Beyond Good and Evil
87
Chapter 6 Life
99
Conclusion
127
Notes
149
Works Cited
153
Index
159
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Claire Colebrook is
Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of English at Penn State University, USA.

Bibliographic information