Blind Realism: An Essay on Human Knowledge and Natural Science

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Rowman & Littlefield, Aug 1, 1996 - Philosophy - 264 pages
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Blind Realism originated in the deeply felt conviction that the widespread acceptance of Gettier-type counterexamples to the classical definition of knowledge rests in a demonstrably erroneous understanding of the nature of human knowledge. In seeking to defend that conviction, Robert F. Almeder offers a fairly detailed and systematic picture of the nature and limits of human factual knowledge.
 

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Contents

NonBasic Knowledge
1
Knowledge Without Correspondence
2
A Concept Without Instances
32
Objections to There Being Knowledge in the Weak Sense of Knows
35
In Each Case Knowledge Is Completely Justified True Belief
38
The Emptiness of Knowing Strongly
40
Notes
41
The GettierType Counterexamples
51
Blind Realism
143
A Necessary Connection?
145
Proving the Existence of the External World
147
Proving That Some of Our Factual Beliefs Must Say How the External World Is
151
The Impossible Task
177
Distinguishing Blind Realism from Scientific Realism
183
The Virtues of Blind Realism
187
Notes
188

Causal and Reliability Analyses of Justification
60
Some Implications of Accepting GettierType Counterexamples and Their Inapplicability to the Definitions Offered Earlier
92
The Enduring Quest for Certainty
94
Notes
95
Basic Knowledge
103
Defending Fallibilistic Foundationalism
117
The Definition of Basic Knowledge
125
The Peircean Proposal Suitably Qualified
126
How Items of Basic Knowledge Are True and Subject to Revision Without Needing to Satisfy an Evidence Condition
132
Notes
134
Scientific Progress and Peircean Utopian Realism
197
The Death of Revolutionary Science
200
The Indefinitely Long Future of Science
218
Notes
222
Conclusion Blind Utopian Realism
225
Bibliography
227
Index
243
About the Author
249
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About the author (1996)

Robert F. Almeder, Professor of Philosophy at Georgia State University, has written widely on epistemology and philosophy of science, including The Philosophy of Charles S. Peirce: A Critical Introduction (Rowman & Littlefield, 1980).

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