Blind Spot: The Secret History of American Counterterrorism

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Basic Books, Apr 24, 2009 - History - 432 pages
2 Reviews
In this revelatory new account, national security expert Timothy Naftali relates the full story of America's decades-long attempt to fight terrorism. On September 11, 2001, a long history of failures and missteps came to a head, with tragic results. But, explains Naftali, it didn't have to be so. Blind Spot traces the long history of American efforts to thwart terrorism, from World War II to the Munich Games hostage-taking to the first attack on the World Trade Center in 1993. In riveting detail, based on original research and interviews with the key participants, Naftali describes why our early successes in counterterrorism did not translate into success against Osama bin Laden later in the 1990s, and why, until 9/11, the domestic threat of terrorism was the largest blind spot in United States national security.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - carterchristian1 - LibraryThing

This booik could have been subtitled " How the US Failed." The author goes back to WWII days to show the lack of success in fighting terrorists. Perhaps had the author taken the story back to George ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gmicksmith - LibraryThing

Other than Michael Scheuer's excellent three works on terrorism, this is an required, and much needed historical perspective on counter-terrorism. Naftali writes: "After years of studying the ... Read full review

Contents

II
1
IV
19
V
54
VII
78
IX
99
XI
116
XII
150
XIII
202
XV
227
XVI
260
XVIII
286
XX
311
XXI
327
XXII
335
XXIII
389
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About the author (2009)

Timothy Naftali is Associate Professor and Director of the Presidential Recordings Program and Kremlin Decision-Making Project at the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. He lives in Charlottesville, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.

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