Blood on the Tracks: The Life and Times of S. Brian Willson

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PM Press, Jul 1, 2011 - Biography & Autobiography - 500 pages
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After serving in the Vietnam War, S. Brian Willson became a radical, nonviolent peace protester and pacifist, and this memoir details the drastic governmental and social change he has spent his life fighting for. Chronicling his personal struggle with a government he believes to be unjust, Willson sheds light on the various incarnations of his protests of the U.S. government, including the refusal to pay taxes, public fasting, and, most famously, public obstruction. On September 1, 1987, Willson was run over by a U.S. government munitions train during a nonviolent blocking action in which he expected to be removed from the tracks. Providing a full look into the tragic event, Willson, who lost his legs in the incident, discusses how the subsequent publicity propelled his cause toward the national consciousness. Now, 23 years later, Willson tells his story of social injustice, nonviolent struggle, and the so-called American way of life.
 

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I cannot speak to the veracity of the rest of the book, but the paragraph beginning with the words, "Our first team arrived in Nicaragua" (Pg. 190) is incorrect. I know because I was intimately involved with this part of the story. I was a member of the Bill Motto Post, and I was - as the following note that I have just sent to Brian Willson expresses, and as a webpage I have set up on Facebook confirms - a member of the first Veterans Peace Action Team.
https://www.facebook.com/notes/jim-bush/note-to-brian-willson-author-of-blood-on-the-tracks/243492565707087
 

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About the author (2011)

S. Brian Willson is a Vietnam veteran and nonviolent pacifist. He lives in Portland, Oregon. Daniel Ellsberg is a former U.S. military analyst who released the Pentagon Papers to the New York Times and other newspapers. He lives in San Francisco.

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