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Dell, 1974 - Juvenile Fiction - 153 pages
21 Reviews
Blubber is a good name for her, the note from Caroline said about Linda. Jill crumpled it up and left it on the corner of her school desk. She didn't want to think about Linda or her dumb report on the whale just then. Jill wanted to think about Halloween.
But Robby grabbed the note and before Linda stopped talking it had gone halfway around the room.
That's where it all started...there was something about Linda that made a lot of kids in her fifth-grade class want to see how far they could go...but nobody, Jill least of all, expected the fun to end where it did.

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User Review  - tburfe1 - LibraryThing

I really enjoyed this novel. Judy Blume has a great way of writing that intrigues the reader, while also making them think deeply about the issues at hand. Blubber is a story about a group of girls ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lgrube4 - LibraryThing

I enjoyed this chapter book. It reminded me of middle school. The story was about a girl named Jill, who is narrating the book. She is friends with Wendy, and they like bullying people, especially ... Read full review


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About the author (1974)

Judy Blume was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey on February 12, 1938. She received a bachelor's degree in education from New York University in 1961. Her first book, The One in the Middle Is the Green Kangaroo, was published in 1969. Her other books include Are You There, God? It's Me Margaret; Then Again, Maybe I Won't; Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing; Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great; and Blubber. Her adult titles include Wifey, Smart Women, Summer Sisters, and In the Unlikely Event. In 1996, she received the American Library Association's Margaret A. Edwards Award for Lifetime Achievement and in 2004, she received the National Book Foundation's Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

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