Bluescreen Compositing: A Practical Guide for Video & Moviemaking

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Taylor & Francis, 2007 - Computers - 233 pages
Master the art and technique of blue and greenscreen compositing with this comprehensive how-to course in creating effective and realistic composited scenes in video formats. You get clear, understandable explanations of the different types of keying techniques and how they work, including real-world examples and tutorials. Topics include setting up a greenscreen studio, how to light the screen effectively, how to light the talent or foreground material, and matching lighting to the composited background plate. Complete tutorials of each of the major software keyers walk you through the process for creating a clean and accurate composite.

* 4 color illustrations detail the art and technique of compositing
* Complete guide to studio set-up, keying and troubleshooting
* DVD packed with real-world examples and tutorial lessons
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 The Basics of How Compositing Works
5
3 Types of Keying Processes
15
4 Simple NonAction Compositing Solutions
25
5 Setting Up a Chroma Key Studio
41
6 Lighting for Chroma Key
59
7 Costuming and Art Design for ColorBased Compositing
83
8 Video Format Problems
93
11 Live Keying
127
12 Tutorials
143
13 Creating New Visions with Changing Technology
193
Glossary
203
Building a Permanent Cyclorama
219
Calibrating Your Monitor
221
Manufacturers
224
Index
226

9 Creating the Plates
101
10 Problems in Post
115
DVD Credits
233
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

John Jackman is an award-winning independent director and producer who has been involved in dramatic and video production since the mid-seventies. Widely regarded as an authority on digital production techniques, John has been a contributing editor to DV Magazine, and has taught workshops for NAB, the American Film Institute (AFI), Digital Video Expo, the Library of Congress, along with various film schools, colleges, and university programs.

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