Body Horror: Photojournalism, Catastrophe and War

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Manchester University Press, 1998 - Freedom of information - 210 pages
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What compels us to look at shocking photographs or, alternatively, to look away? Should the media use disturbing images to inform, at the risk of offending? How is our sense of politics, morality, and culture affected when we are exposed to gruesome images of accidents and disasters, murder and execution, grief and death? In Body Horror, John Taylor addresses these questions by examining how the media presents unsettling pictures, especially those of dead and injured "foreigners." Drawing on news coverage of recent events in the Gulf, Bosnia and Rwanda, Taylor argues that documentary photography, for all the horror it reproduces, ultimately defines a democracy.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Caught looking
13
Why look?
29
Press photography and evidence
43
Press shock
69
Disaster tragedy
87
Murder
112
S Foreign bodies
129
The body vanishes in the Gulf War
157
Conclusion
193
Select bibliography
197
Index
206
Copyright

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Ethics for Journalists
Richard Keeble
No preview available - 2008
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About the author (1998)

John Taylor, a journalist for more than two decades, has been a contributing editor at New York magazine and a senior writer for Esquire. He lives in East Moriches, New York.

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