Body Projects in Japanese Childcare: Culture, Organization and Emotions in a Preschool

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Psychology Press, 1997 - Education - 166 pages
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This book examines the place of body practices and the management of emotions in Japanese preschools. Early childhood socialization is explored as a set of 'body projects': a series of practices undertaken (over time) to design the body according to prevailing cultural definitions and images. The concept 'body projects' allows us to understand how the body is, at one and the same time, a malleable material capable of being fashioned in a certain manner, an entity which represents social relations and notions, and an embodiment of affective attitudes and stances towards the world.
 

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Contents

The Institutional Framework
14
From Mothering to Othering
30
Hoikuen Kibbutz and Sleep
54
Three Little Japanese Pigs
82
The Marathon
93
Menus
111
Name Calling Power Play
117
An Instance of Discipline?
135
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About the author (1997)

Eyal Ben-Ari is assistant professor at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology and senior research fellow at the Harry S. Truman Institute of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

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