Boko Haram and the War on Terror

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ABC-CLIO, Aug 15, 2016 - Political Science - 187 pages

In 2009, Nigerian security forces stormed a religious cult by the name of Boko Haram, killing its leader and thousands of followers. Six years later, Boko Haram is an enemy to reckon with, boasting 15,000 members and taking credit for 20,000 deaths. This book looks at the successful rise of this terrorist group, probing the religious and political environment that enabled a relatively small cult to threaten a nation.

The study draws on the author's fieldwork in Nigeria, where she had access to officials, activists, psychologists, and military personnel. Written in a clear and accessible manner, it offers a micro-to-macro investigation of the Boko Haram as a phenomenon. It also provides readers with an understanding of the regional dynamics that obstructed political and military cooperation among neighboring countries, enabling Boko Haram's success. This book traces the group's religious origins in the early 2000s and documents its violent political claims in Nigeria and across the border in Northern Cameroon, Niger, and Chad. Finally, it examines the impact of the international War on Terror and presents a comparative study of other contemporary terrorism movements and their networks.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 The Great Divide
11
2 Violence and Religious Rivalry
35
3 The Making of Boko Haram
55
4 The Flight of Boko Haram
77
5 Regional Security and Cooperation
97
6 Boko Haram and the Global Jihad
115
Conclusion
139
Notes
145
Bibliography
167
Index
183
About the Author
189
Copyright

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About the author (2016)

Caroline Varin, PhD, is lecturer in security and international organizations at Regent's University London.

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