Bookbinders and Their Craft

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Charles Scribner's Sons, 1903 - Bookbinding - 298 pages
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Page 87 - of design and decoration have sifted down and gathered together, so that foolish ornament gains accumulative force and achieves a conspicuous commonness. Stem, petal, and leaf—the fluent forms that a man has not by heart, but certainly by rote—are woven, printed, cast, and stamped wherever restlessness and insimplicity have feared to leave plain spaces.
Page 35 - Warm in his friendships as in his politicks, a convivial, cheerful companion, and unalterable in the cut and colour of his coat, he uniformly pursued one great object, fair dealing, and will survive in the list of booksellers the most eminent for being adventurous and scientific, by the name of honest Tom Payne.
Page 14 - our plesour, the honour and proffit of our Realme and Liegis, takin on thame to furnis and bring hame ane prent, with all stuff belangand tharto and expert men to use the
Page 87 - fluent forms that a man has not by heart, but certainly by rote—are woven, printed, cast, and stamped wherever restlessness and insimplicity have feared to leave plain spaces." If we turn to our furniture is it not mostly covered with ornament—save the
Page 52 - taste, and, in many instances, appropriated to the subject of the work or the age and time of the author ; and each book of his binding was accompanied by a written description of the ornaments in a most precise and curious style. His chef
Page 87 - really grown to can be gauged nowhere so well as in country lodgings, where the most ordinary things of design and decoration have sifted down and gathered together, so that foolish ornament gains
Page 35 - bespoke either squalid wretchedness or a foolish and fierce indifference to the received opinions of mankind. His hair was unkempt, his attire wretched ; and the interior of his workshop—where, like the Turk, he would ' bear no brother near his throne
Page 52 - to the founders of magnificent libraries. This ingenious man introduced a style of binding uniting elegance with durability, such as no person has ever been able to imitate. He may be ranked indeed
Page 86 - own paltriness revisits him — his triviality, his sloth, his cheapness, his wholesale habitualness, his slatternly ostentation. What the tyranny has really grown to can be gauged nowhere so well as in country lodgings, where the most ordinary things of design and decoration have sifted down and gathered together, so that foolish ornament gains accumulative force and achieves a conspicuous commonness. Stem, petal, and
Page 125 - The possession of a very fine collection of ancient bindings has enabled M. Leon Gruel to become an authority on the history of binding and to make researches which took shape a few years back in the " Manuel historique et bibliographique de

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