Bookbinding, and the Care of Books: A Handbook for Amateurs, Bookbinders & Librarians

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D. Appleton, 1901 - Bookbinding - 342 pages
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Page 284 - The following is an extract from the report of the Committee of the Society of Arts on the deterioration of paper, published in 1898: "The committee find that the paper-making fibres may be ranged into four classes — A.
Page 8 - ... as a mere matter of appearance. Such "ornamentation" as there was was usually obtained by following in a mechanical way a drawing provided by an artist who often knew little of the technical processes involved in production. With the critical attention given to the crafts by Ruskin and Morris, it came to be seen that it was impossible to detach design from craft in this way, and that, in the widest sense, true design is an inseparable element of good quality, involving as it does the selection...
Page 9 - ... falls into affectation. Proper ornamentation may be defined as a language addressed to the eye; it is pleasant thought expressed in the speech of the tool. In the third place, we would have this series put artistic craftsmanship before people as furnishing reasonable occupations for those who would gain a livelihood.
Page 265 - ... years showed far greater evidence of deterioration than those of an earlier date. Many recent bindings showed evidence of decay after so short a period as ten, or even five years.
Page 270 - In nearly all samples of Russia leather a very violent form of red decay was noticed. In many cases the leather was found to be absolutely rotten in all parts exposed to light and air, so that on the very slightest rubbing with a blunt instrument the leather fell into fine dust.
Page 10 - Editor'i certainty of academic art. It is desirable in every way that men of good education should be brought back into the productive crafts: there are more than enough of us
Page 274 - ... there is no doubt that, as a general rule, tightly fitting glass cases conduce to their preservation. (4) The committee have satisfied themselves that it is possible to test any leather in such a way as to guarantee its suitability for bookbinding. They have not come to any decision as to the desirability of establishing any formal or official standard, though they consider that this is a point which well deserves future consideration.
Page 285 - In regard, therefore, to papers for books and documents of permanent value, the selection must be taken in this order, and always with due regard to the fulfilment of the conditions of normal treatment above dealt with as common to all papers. The committee have been desirous of bringing their investigations to a practical conclusion in specific terms, viz.. by the suggestion of standards of quality. It is evident that in the majority of cases there is little fault to find with the practical adjustments...
Page 270 - In some cases inferior leathers are finished (by methods in themselves injurious) so as to imitate the better class leathers, and of course, where these are used durability cannot be expected. But in the main the injury for which the manufacturer and bookbinder are responsible must be attributed rather to ignorance of the effect of the means employed to give the leather the outward qualities required for binding than to the intentional production of an inferior article.
Page 8 - Preface little considered, and there was a tendency to look on " design " as a mere matter of appearance. Such " ornamentation " as there was was usually obtained by following in a mechanical way a drawing provided by an artist who often knew little of the technical processes involved in production. With the critical attention given to the crafts by Ruskin and Morris, it came to be seen that it was impossible to detach design from craft in this...

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