Boston Confucianism: Portable Tradition in the Late-Modern World

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Sep 28, 2000 - Philosophy - 258 pages
0 Reviews
Is it possible to be a Confucian without being East Asian, as so many philosophers have been Platonists without being Greek? Strangely enough, many scholars would answer in the negative, citing the inextricable connection between Confucianism and East Asian culture. Boston Confucianism argues to the contrary, maintaining that Confucianism can be important to the contemporary global conversation of philosophy and should not be confined to an East Asian context. It promotes a multicultural philosophy of culture and makes a contribution to Confucian-Christian dialogue, showing that the relations among the world's great civilizations today is not a "clash," as Samuel Huntington has argued, but an entanglement whose roots are worth sorting and whose contemporary mutual developments are worth promoting.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Short Happy Life of Boston Confucianism
1
12 Ritual Propriety
8
13 Pragmatism
11
14 Confucian Critique for Boston
15
15 Bostonian Modifications of Confucianism
21
Confucianism on Culture
25
22 An Elementary Theory of Culture and Nature in Xunzi
27
Confucian Daoist Legalist Moist and Buddhist
29
63 Ancient Cultural Motifs and Their Development
115
64 Relations of Motifs to Deeper Imaginative Artifacts
121
65 Motifs and Their Sequelae
124
Motifs of Being
129
72 Philosophy as Engagement
131
73 Western Motifs for Being
134
74 The Dialectic of Being
135
75 South and East Asian Motifs for Being
139

24 Confucius Mencius and Xunzi Compared
33
25 Confucian Contributions to a Contemporary Philosophy of Culture
38
Confucianism in the Contemporary Situation
41
32 Interpretive Bridging and Normative Philosophers
43
33 Roger T Ames and David L Hall
47
34 Cheng Chungking
50
35 Wu Kuangming
52
Confucian Spirituality
57
Defining Hypotheses
62
43 Self Truth and Transformation
69
44 Confucian Spirituality in a Scientific Society
74
45 Confucian Spirituality in a Global Moral Democracy and Ecology
79
Tu Weimings Confucianism
83
52 The Question of Conversion
88
53 The Question of Ritual
92
54 The Question of Love Ren
96
55 The Question of Evil
102
Motif Analysis East and West
107
62 Comparison
111
Motifs of Transcendence
147
82 Transcendence in Ancient Confucianism
151
83 Transcendence in NeoConfucianism
154
84 God and the Imago Dei
158
85 John Wesley and the Image of God
161
Resources for a Conception of Selfhood
167
92 The Self as Contradictory and SelfDeceived in Western Thought
169
93 The Self in Confucian Thought
175
94 SelfDeception in Confucian Thought
179
95 The Self as Orientation and Poise
186
Confucianism Christianity and Multiple Religious identity
193
102 Filial Piety as Holy Duty
194
103 Ritual Propriety
201
104 Jesus as Model
204
105 Multiple Religious Identity
206
Notes
211
Bibliography
223
Index
237
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

Robert Cummings Neville is Professor of Philosophy, Religion, and Theology at Boston University and Dean of the School of Theology. He is past president of the International Society for Chinese Philosophy, the American Academy of Religion, and the Metaphysical Society of America. Neville is the author and editor of many books, including most recently The Recovery of Philosophy in America: Essays in Honor of John Edwin Smith, also published by SUNY Press.

Bibliographic information