Bottom Line Management

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Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 11, 2008 - Business & Economics - 106 pages
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Bottom Line Management presents a new approach to management. It will help you if you are a senior manager in an organization and have a seat at the table where key decisions are made. It will help you be a valued employee recognized as doing the good work of the organization.

What makes you valuable to your organization? You’re valuable if the organization would lose out if it weren’t paying you for your input. The head would have significantly more to do if you weren’t there. Without you, less would be produced. In your absence, poorer decisions would be made.

Bottom Line Management gives you essential tools so that you can truly be valuable to your organization. In a very practical way it gives examples of successful rules how to maximize your contribution to the Bottom Line, and how to avoid popular mistakes in managerial dicision making.

But in order for you to be valuable, your input must truly be valuable. Your input cannot be valuable if you do not know what the organization is trying to achieve and what strategy the head of the organization and the other leaders have adopted to try to achieve it, or if you cannot contribute to the making of good, sound, purposeful decisions.

Bottom Line Management will help you understand the organization’s bottom line and contribute to it.

Bottom Line Management gives you essential tools so that you can truly be valuable to your organization.

 

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Contents

Bottom Line Management An Introduction
1
What the Bottom Line Is
2
Its Costly Not to Know What the Bottom Line Is
4
One Companys Story
6
Bottom Line DecisionMaking
7
In Summary
8
Purposeful Behavior What Are We Working Toward?
10
How the Bottom Line is Different from Mission Vision and Values
12
Thinking Inside and Outside the Box
57
Using Shorthand Rules Can Get You in Trouble
58
A Variant in a NotforProfit Setting
59
In Summary
60
Three Good Decision Rules and Many Many Bad Ones
61
The Store Detectives Case
62
Correct and Incorrect Answers in the Store Detectives Case
64
Considering Only Benefits or Only Costs
65

How a ClearlyDefined Bottom Line Helps You Manage Yourself and Others
14
Lack of Clarity is Endemic
15
Cultural and Ethical Constraints
18
In Summary
20
Five Types of Organizational Bottom Lines
23
Highly Focused NotforProfits
25
DominantObjective Organizations
27
Double or Multiple Bottom Line Organizations
29
Cant Tell Organizations
31
In Summary
32
Benefits Costs Profits and the Good Work of the Organization
34
Profit and Loss Revenue and Cost
37
ProfitFocused DecisionMaking in Companies
39
Benefits and Costs in NotforProfits
40
What if Benefits and Costs are Hard to Quantify?
43
In Summary
45
Making Decisions to Maximize the Bottom Line
49
When Do You Maximize and When Do You Optimize?
50
The Advertising Agency Problem
51
The Most Common Decision
52
Using Spreadsheets to Help You Maximize
54
Other Incorrect Answers
56
Using the Wrong Ratios
66
Comparing the Decision Rules
67
Distinguishing the Good Decision Rules from the Bad Ones
69
Developing a New Product
72
In Summary
74
Making Investment Decisions Rate of Return and Net Present Value
77
Rate of Return and Net Present Value
78
Using Rate of Return and Net Present Value to Make UpDown Decisions
80
Using Rate of Return and Net Present Value to Choose Among Projects
82
Decisions Based on Rate of Return and Net Present Value
83
Rate of Return Net Present Value and the Bottom Line
84
A Fixed Training Budget
85
In Summary
87
Making Interdependent Decisions People Process and Technology
90
People Process and Technology in Custom Apparel Production
92
Some Possible Answers
93
Getting the Correct Answer
94
Whats Wrong with Some of the Answers Given
97
Analyzing the Correct Decision
99
In Summary
101
Bottom Line Management An Executive Summary
103
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Gary Fields is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of California, San Diego.

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