Bound by the City: Greek Tragedy, Sexual Difference, and the Formation of the Polis

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Denise Eileen McCoskey, Emily Zakin
SUNY Press, Jul 2, 2010 - Drama - 352 pages
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This collection offers a vibrant exploration of the bonds between sexual difference and political structure in Greek tragedy. In looking at how the acts of violence and tortured kinship relations are depicted in the work of all three major Greek tragic playwrights—Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides—the contributors shed light on the workings and failings of the Greek polis, and explore the means by which sexual difference and the city take shape in relation to each other. The volume complements and expands the efforts of current feminist interpretations of Antigone and the Oresteia by considering the meanings of tragedy for ancient Athenian audiences while also unveiling the reverberations of Greek tragedy’s formulations and dilemmas in modern political life and for contemporary political philosophy.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 City Farewell Genos Polis and Gender in Aeschylus Seven Against Thebes and Euripides Phoenician Women
15
The Work of Literature and the History of Subjectivity
47
3 The Laius Complex
81
4 Jocastas Eye and Freuds Uncanny
103
5 Sexual Difference and the Aporia of Justicein Sophocles ANTIGONE
119
6 Tragedy Natural Law and Sexual Difference in Hegel
149
Intimate Strangers and the Fury of Democracy
177
Prophecies of the Feminine in the Polis and Beyond
197
9 The Loss of Abandonment in Sophocles ELECTRA
221
10 Electra in Exile
247
11 Orestes and the Inlaws
275
Contributors
331
Index
335
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About the author (2010)

At Miami University, Denise Eileen McCoskey is Associate Professor of Classics and Affiliate Black World Studies, and Emily Zakin is Associate Professor of Philosophy. Zakin is the coeditor (with Ellen K. Feder and Mary C. Rawlinson) of Derrida and Feminism: Recasting the Question of Woman.

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