Bradshaw's illustrated hand-book for travellers in Belgium, on the Rhine, and through portions of Rhenish Prussia

Front Cover
0 Reviews

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 44 - There have been tears and breaking hearts for thee, And mine were nothing, had I such to give ; But when I stood beneath the fresh green tree, Which living waves where thou didst cease to live, And saw around me the wide field revive With fruits and fertile promise, and the Spring Come forth her work of gladness to contrive, With all her reckless birds upon the wing, I turn'd from all she brought to those she could not bring.
Page 44 - Was it a soothing or a mournful thought, Amid this scene of slaughter as we stood, Where armies had with recent fury fought, To mark how gentle Nature still pursued Her quiet course, as if she took no care For what her noblest work had suffer'd there.
Page 40 - Dewy with nature's tear-drops as they pass, Grieving, if aught inanimate e'er grieves, Over the unreturning brave, — alas! Ere evening to be trodden like the grass Which now beneath them, but above shall grow In its next verdure, when this fiery mass Of living valour, rolling on the foe And burning with high hope, shall moulder cold and low.
Page 94 - And there they stand, as stands a lofty mind, Worn, but unstooping to the baser crowd, All tenantless, save to the crannying wind, Or holding dark communion with the cloud. There was a day when they were young and proud, Banners on high, and battles pass'd below ; But they who fought are in a bloody shroud, And those which waved are shredless dust ere now, And the bleak battlements shall bear no future blow.
Page 40 - And Ardennes waves above them her green leaves, Dewy with nature's tear-drops, as they pass, Grieving, if aught inanimate e'er grieves, Over the unreturning brave, — alas! Ere evening to be trodden like the grass...
Page 49 - JL.L on the occasion of his recent visit to this town. This first class Hotel is particularly recommended for its large and airy apartments, having the finest situation, near the Station, facing the Palace and joining a fine garden. It contains comfortable Apartments. A Large Dining Room, Breakfast and Reading Rooms, Cold and Warm Baths, &c.
Page 18 - Fair city, worthy of her ancient fame ! The season of her splendour is gone by, Yet everywhere its monuments remain : Temples which rear their stately heads on high, Canals that intersect the fertile plain — "Wide streets and squares, with many a court and hall, Spacious and undefaced — but ancient all.
Page 85 - As it flows down from the distant ridges of the Alps, through fertile regions into the open sea, so it comes down from remote antiquity, associated in every age with momentous events in the history of the neighbouring nations.
Page 167 - Above me are the Alps, The palaces of Nature, whose vast walls Have pinnacled in clouds their snowy scalps, And throned Eternity in icy halls Of cold sublimity, where forms and falls The avalanche — the thunderbolt of snow ! All that expands the spirit, yet appals, Gather around these summits, as to show How Earth may pierce to Heaven, yet leave vain man below.
Page 26 - Salons de reunion ; an English chapel ; and one of the most beautiful Gardens in the country. The Hotel is very agreeably situated for the two seasons. During the winter the Hall and landings are warmed.

Bibliographic information